Friday, May 18, 2007

I NEED TO KNOW?

The Way to Divinity

If anyone speaks ill of you,
Praise them always.
If anyone injures you,
Serve them nicely.
If anyone persecutes you,
Help them in all possible ways.
You will attain
immense strength.
You will control anger and pride.
You will enjoy
peace, poise, and serenity.
You will become divine.

- Swami Sivananda
Hindu

(Jesus says the same thing in his Sermon on the Mount.)



CATHERINE CRIER from COURT TV had to reschedule. Today, Doug and I wing it with a mix of politics and non-political comedy.

SATURDAY MORNINGS TUNE IN LIVE FROM LAS VEGAS and LOS ANGELES to our show BASHAM AND CORNELL PROGRESSIVE TALK
from 9 - 10 a.m. We broadcast live -- or go to our website and click on the link to hear the entire show in the archives.



The following thoughts are from my beautiful sister Kathy.

Here's my opinion.

I hate this kind of thing. The film is simplistic and sentimental
tripe. It addresses a non-issue. Who is this film aimed at? No one
blames the soldiers! No one hates them for "doing their job" or
doesn't "support our troops". The premise of the film is a fiction.
It is propaganda.

This film and "patriotic" statements like it completely sidesteps the
fact that none of those soldiers had to die, because they should not
have been there in the first place. It's selling an old idea that to
die in war is honorable.

If you have a family member serving in Iraq, of course you are proud
of them! The rest of us are just disgusted and ashamed at our
government that even one American has had to die over there. No one
blames the soldiers for fighting an immoral and unjust war right now.
They are just doing the government's (dirty) work.

Also. Don't try to tell me how to feel! I don't have to feel "proud"
of the American soldiers. I can feel that they are very brave, and
strong, and feel very sorry that they are there. I can feel angry and
sad. But no, I'm not particularly proud. I feel afraid, worried,
upset, sorry and sad and deeply angry at my government for creating
the mess we find ourselves in in Iraq where so many beautiful lives
have been cut short on all sides of the conflict. I want all
non-Iraqi troops to get to go home, where ever they are from.

War is not inherently just or good. War is a human tragedy on a grand
scale. It should be considered a last resort. I believe it is only
justified to stop a genocide. But war is more often a strategic game
of the elite - a machine created by the powerful to divide and
re-divide wealth and power amongst themselves.

The idea of patriotism in a time of war is inherently propagandistic.
If you buy into it, then you probably also believe that things go
better with Coke or that Winston tastes good like a cigarette should.
Who benefits the most by selling these ideas to the public?

Can you imagine this type of film coming from the jihad point of
view? Sentimentalizing the self-sacrifice of the suicide bomber,
complete with heart-tugging strings? We would all be spitting angry,
and see the suicide bombers themselves as pawns of an evil elite.

As a nation we have absolutely nothing to be proud of in the current
war in Iraq. Our leadership has destroyed our reputation worldwide
and our economy at home, making the world a much more dangerous place
than it was before and right after 9/11. I don't blame the soldiers
for this, or hold it against them. I'm smart enough to make the
distinction that to hate this war is not the same thing as hating the
people fighting it.

The Newshour with Jim Lehrer is the only news show that still honors
the fallen soldiers every night at the end of the newscast. Why do
you think the other networks stopped doing so years ago? The Newshour
uses no sentimental music - only complete silence, with portraits,
names and home towns. This is a thousand times more powerful to me,
because it isn't trying to manipulate my emotions the way this piece
does.

I do admire men and women who
join up and go off to war when everyone in the country is contributing,
and when we've actually been attacked -- but when the rich keep getting
richer and no one else is expected to make any sacrifices, etc., etc.
-- well, it really is propaganda. Also, I do not like the idea of
mercenary forces, where people are paid to do all the fighting and the
sons and daughters of all the warmongers (and the chicken hawks
themselves) avoid having to serve.

Thanks for letting me express my reaction!

k


Don't forget to listen to the Basham and Cornell Progressive Talk Show Saturday at 9:00 AM PST. BashamandCornell

102 comments:

  1. Thought provoking video and comments Lydia.

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  2. Great post Kathy..........I couldnt agree more with what you just said..........you nailed it, I dont like propaganda or being told how to think or what to say and thats all the Reich Wing in the White House does.

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  3. Excellent post, Lydia, and Kathy writes really well, too.

    To honor the troops...look, Michael Moore put it best in F9/11...these are the people who have the least to gain from our nation, yet who are the first to go fight when the chips are on the table.

    The only thing they want in exchange is to be sent only when necessary. Clearly, this was not the case here.

    We ought to honor them by getting them the hell out as fast as possible.

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  4. Washington Post | May 19, 2007 01:00 AM

    "[Expletive] you! I know more about this than anyone else in the room," shouted McCain at Cornyn. McCain helped craft a bill in 2006 that passed the Senate but couldn't be compromised with a House bill that was much tougher on illegal immigrants.

    Cornyn's office declined to comment on the incident. McCain's camp specifically denied that the senator ever claimed to know more about the immigration issue than other senators, but acknowledged that the two Republicans had quite a disagreement.


    McCain is losing his feeble mind.

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  5. KABUL, Afghanistan - A suicide attacker detonated himself next to German soldiers shopping in a crowded market in northern Afghanistan on Saturday, killing eight people and wounding 16, officials said.

    I thought Bush said he won that war.

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  6. At least 146 contract workers were killed in the first three months of 2007, revealing the increased risks they face as the military steps up its effort in Iraq.

    "Surge" on Bush.

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  7. BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Britain's Tony Blair, on his last visit to Iraq as prime minister, said on Saturday he had no regrets about his part in the U.S.-led invasion that removed Saddam Hussein.

    On a farewell trip to a country whose future may define his legacy after a decade in power, Blair met Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki and President Jalal Talabani and discussed the situation in Iraq which is beset by sectarian violence.

    "I have no regrets about removing Saddam, no," Blair told a joint news conference with Maliki and Talabani after their talks about how to bring about greater political reconciliation.

    No regrets for all those deaths, from Bush's lapdog.

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  8. Gas prices has risen 78% in the past five years.

    Funny thing, Bush the oil man has been in office sis years.

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  9. Charlotte Higgins in Cannes
    Saturday May 19, 2007

    Guardian

    Cannes is smacking its lips in anticipation of filmmaker and provocateur Michael Moore's latest jeremiad against the US administration, which receives its premiere at the film festival today. Sicko, a documentary tackling the state of American healthcare, focuses on the pharmaceutical giants, and particularly on health insurers.
    The film has already caused Moore - who won the Palme d'Or at Cannes in 2004 with Fahrenheit 911 - to clash with the American authorities. Now, according to movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, whose Weinstein Company is behind the film, the US government is attempting to impound the negative.

    According to Weinstein, the US Treasury's moves meant "we had to fly the movie to another country"- he would not say to where. "Let the secret service find that out - though this is the same country that thought there were weapons of mass destruction, so they'll never find it." He added that he feared that if the film were impounded, there might be attempts to cut some footage, in particular the last 20 minutes, which related to a trip to Cuba. This, said Weinstein, "would not be good."

    Censorship by Bush.

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  10. As of Friday, May 18, 2007, at least 3,409 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003, according to an Associated Press count. The figure includes seven military civilians. At least 2,773 died as a result of hostile action, according to the military's numbers.

    Are you happy Bush?

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  11. Mortars rocked the green zone, including one hitting the British Embassy, while Tony Blair paid a surprise visit today.

    "Surge" on Bush.

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  12. Larry, thank you for helping me when I was out of town. We are live right now on the air, continuing with phone calls at www.bashamandcornell.com

    God Bless you!
    xoxo

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  13. Mike, Worf, Carl, Susie, Clif, Larry -- thank you for all your great comments.

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  14. Hi Lydia!

    Listening to your show now... :)

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  15. Big K - Great to hear from you.

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  16. Susie, we sort of "winged it" this time, totally ad-lib. Catherine Crier had a job interview hopefully with a new network.

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  17. Lydia:

    That was me trying to call you but no answer...OOPS! I realize you were talking.. LOL

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  18. Catherine Crier's assistant FORGOT to call and reschedule her interview? Not good...

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  19. Lydia & Doug:

    You did a great show..."winging it" :D

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  20. Long time no see.

    I see the republicans are repeating history from the 1970's and taking the mainstream conservatives down the path to oblivion just as Richard M Nixon and the Vietnam War did in the 1970's.

    In fact i'm willing to bet that it may be deja vous to 1974 soon and we may see some high level people in Bush's administration either resign or be impeached.

    of course just like in 1976 it will torpedo any chance mainstream decent Republicans have in the 2008 elections.

    Mainstream conservatives will loathe the name George W. Bush since he will be associated with the extremist faction of neo cons who hijacked and destroyed the party.

    The crazies controlling the party the last decade or so make me ashamed i ever supported the Republicans. These men have no honor. President Bush and his administration make Richard Nixon look like a benevolent boyscout.

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  21. Oh Lydia, i forgot to say you and Doug had another great show, as usual.

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  22. Hey Troll Tex, Volt and Fascist Fan, For all the times you clowns bashed Carter for being a terrible president, I thought YOU might like THIS.......ENJOY!!!!!!!


    Who's the better president?
    Jimmy Carter 62%
    George W. Bush 38%
    Total Votes: 11,918

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  23. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  24. here;s some more:

    Updated:2007-05-19 19:07:38
    Former President Carter Blasts Bush
    AP
    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (May 19) - Former President Carter says President Bush's administration is "the worst in history" in international relations, taking aim at the White House's policy of pre-emptive war and its Middle East diplomacy.

    The criticism from Carter, which a biographer says is unprecedented for the 39th president, also took aim at Bush's environmental policies and the administration's "quite disturbing" faith-based initiative funding.

    "I think as far as the adverse impact on the nation around the world, this administration has been the worst in history," Carter told the Arkansas Democrat -Gazette in a story that appeared in the newspaper's Saturday editions. "The overt reversal of America's basic values as expressed by previous administrations, including those of George H.W. Bush and Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon and others, has been the most disturbing to me."

    Carter spokeswoman Deanna Congileo confirmed his comments to The Associated Press on Saturday and declined to elaborate. He spoke while promoting his new audiobook series, "Sunday Mornings in Plains," a collection of weekly Bible lessons from his hometown of Plains, Ga.

    "Apparently, Sunday mornings in Plains for former President Carter includes hurling reckless accusations at your fellow man," said Amber Wilkerson, Republican National Committee spokeswoman. She said it was hard to take Carter seriously because he also "challenged Ronald Reagan's strategy for the Cold War."

    Carter came down hard on the Iraq war.

    "We now have endorsed the concept of pre-emptive war where we go to war with another nation militarily, even though our own security is not directly threatened, if we want to change the regime there or if we fear that some time in the future our security might be endangered," he said. "But that's been a radical departure from all previous administration policies."

    Carter, who won a Nobel Peace Prize in 2002, criticized Bush for having "zero peace talks" in Israel. Carter also said the administration "abandoned or directly refuted" every negotiated nuclear arms agreement, as well as environmental efforts by other presidents.

    Carter also offered a harsh assessment for the White House's Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, which helped religious charities receive $2.15 billion in federal grants in fiscal year 2005 alone.

    "The policy from the White House has been to allocate funds to religious institutions, even those that channel those funds exclusively to their own particular group of believers in a particular religion," Carter said. "As a traditional Baptist, I've always believed in separation of church and state and honored that premise when I was president, and so have all other presidents, I might say, except this one."

    Douglas Brinkley, a Tulane University presidential historian and Carter biographer, described Carter's comments as unprecedented.

    "This is the most forceful denunciation President Carter has ever made about an American president," Brinkley said. "When you call somebody the worst president, that's volatile. Those are fighting words."

    Carter also lashed out Saturday at British prime minister Tony Blair. Asked how he would judge Blair's support of Bush, the former president said: "Abominable. Loyal. Blind. Apparently subservient."

    "And I think the almost undeviating support by Great Britain for the ill-advised policies of President Bush in Iraq have been a major tragedy for the world," Carter told British Broadcasting Corp. radio.

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  25. What do you think of Carter's remarks about President Bush?
    I agree with all of them 59%
    I disagree with all of them 29%
    I agree with some of them 12%
    Total Votes: 18,718
    Note on Poll Results

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  26. President Ford's strong opinions on other presidents were published soon after his death in December. See what he thought of them.

    Gerald Ford said Ronald Reagan was "probably the least well-informed on the details of running the government of any president I knew."

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  27. Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, whose discharge of a paraplegic man onto skid row earlier this year was widely publicized, says it will adopt new guidelines meant to end the dumping of homeless patients.

    The hospital said Friday that it would create new protocols and provide more staff training for discharging homeless patients. The nation's largest HMO, Kaiser Permanente, announced similar reforms on Tuesday.

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  28. Baghdad- At least 11 Iraqis were killed and 20 wounded
    Saturday in a car bomb blast in western Baghdad, independent Voices
    of Iraq news agency reported, citing a security source.
    A suicide bomber detonated a car rigged with explosives near a
    public market in al-Shurta al-Rabia neighbourhood, also damaging
    stores and vehicles, the source said.

    "Surge" on Bush.

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  29. Marie Cocco — It is time to stop referring to the “fired U.S attorneys scandal” by that misnomer, and call it what it is: a White House-coordinated effort to use the vast powers of the Justice Department to swing elections to Republicans

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  30. Latest News
    Musharraf: Islamic militancy rising
    8 gov't officials kidnapped in Pakistan

    Owner of Pearl slaying site dies

    Return of ex-leaders ruled out

    Militant now backs Pakistan government

    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) -- President Gen. Pervez Musharraf acknowledged that Islamic militancy was increasing across Pakistan and said tough measures were needed to counter it, as religious students from a pro-Taliban mosque abducted four police officers.

    Musharraf made his remarks in an interview aired late Friday by the private Aaj television channel after four plainclothes officers were captured while patrolling in the capital, Islamabad, near the Lal Masjid mosque - notorious for launching its own anti-vice campaign. Two officers were later released.

    The president said that militancy in Pakistan was increasing, and "we need to strongly counter it." Musharraf did not elaborate.

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  31. San Francisco Chronicle to cut 25% of jobs in newsroom
    Joe Garofoli, Chronicle Staff Writer

    Saturday, May 19, 2007

    To cut costs and try to adapt to a changing media marketplace, The Chronicle will trim 25 percent of its newsroom staff by the end of the summer.

    "This is one of the biggest one-time hits we've heard about anywhere in the country," said Tom Rosenstiel, director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism, in Washington.

    Eighty reporters, photographers, copy editors and others, as well as 20 employees in management positions are expected to be laid off by end of the summer. Chronicle Publisher Frank Vega said Friday that voluntary buyouts are likely to be offered.

    Vega declined to say whether the paper is continuing to lose $1 million a week, as Hearst attorney Daniel Wall stated in court in November during a hearing on an antitrust suit filed by San Francisco businessman Clint Reilly.

    More of the Bush economy.

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  32. Hi Guys!

    It's a hot summer night here in the desert but I'm staying in the AC indoors!
    LOL

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  33. Larry:

    You're full of all kinds of good news... LOL

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  34. Thanks Suzie,

    I try to be a positive breaker of news for the blog.

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  35. How Do You Live With It When Your Country Becomes the Fourth Reich!?

    You impeach and try the criminal bastards who did it, that's what! A first year law student can make the capital crimes case against George W. Bush now. So - why is the Congress afraid to impeach a prima facie criminal for whom a capital crimes case would be a cake walk?

    What the MSM Won't Tell You: US Troops are ordered to kill Iraqi civilians indiscriminately. I won't live with that. Will you? How much longer will American citizens tolerate and by tolerating, enabling the most evil regime since Adolph Hitler. Will you be complicit in mass murder?

    Through the general fog of censorship, official bullshit and one-sided reporting, revelations about US-led forces killing Iraqi civilians just keep coming. It's all verifiable. Much of it is admissable in court. Bush is the new "Fuhrer" and US troops are routinely ordered to commit war crimes. If you are in the armed forces and reading this, I suggest that you sober up, grow up and consider the implications of what you have been ordered to do.

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  36. Senators want Baroody nomination pulled By PETE YOST, Associated Press Writer
    Thu May 17, 7:06 PM ET
    Two Democratic senators said Thursday the White House should withdraw the nomination of manufacturers' lobbyist Michael Baroody to run the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

    A third senator, Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama (news, bio, voting record), said Baroody has pursued a number of anti-consumer activities with the National Association of Manufacturers, which will pay the lobbyist $150,000 when he leaves for his new government post.

    Baroody's background clearly illustrates that he cannot provide needed leadership at an agency "serving a critical child safety and public health mission," Sens. Bill Nelson (news, bio, voting record) of Florida and Richard Durbin (news, bio, voting record) of Illinois wrote President Bush.

    The White House said that Baroody has offered on four occasions to discuss his commitment to consumer safety with Nelson.

    "It's unfortunate that Sens. Nelson and Durbin have decided to judge Mr. Baroody by press reports instead of personal conversations," said White House spokeswoman Emily Lawrimore.

    The White House and the NAM have emphasized that the $150,000 payment that would go to Baroody was arranged with senior managers at the manufacturers association in January 2006, long before he was considered for the consumer agency.

    However, a change was made to his agreement early this year when he was under consideration.

    Lawrimore said: "I have been assured the change did not involve the amount of Mr. Baroody's severance package. It regarded the timing."

    The payment falls in the category of "extraordinary" under federal ethics rules, meaning that it is paid on the basis of a determination made after it became known to the employer, in this case NAM, that Baroody was being considered for a government position.

    "It's my understanding that the term 'extraordinary' was used out of an abundance of caution because of the timing issue," said Lawrimore. "The amount of the severance package was determined in January 2006 and has not changed."

    Under federal regulations, Baroody is barred for two years from participating in any particular matter in which the manufactures association is a party. However, he may participate in matters involving members of NAM.

    Baroody "will take all steps necessary to avoid any conflict of interest," Lawrimore said.

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  37. Larry:

    You know I was joking with you! :)

    You do an excellent job of posting important information. ;)

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  38. Suzie:

    Like I told you, I am the positive breaker of bad news.

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  39. Big Ed Thank you!

    Jolly Roger - great posts the other day.

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  40. Larry:

    That you are! LOL

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  41. Gonzo is now called Bush's "Yes Man"...

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  42. Where is everyone? I have been offline for a couple of months and everyone is gone.

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  43. I tried listening to Lydias show in the archives but there are only shows from last week.

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  44. Doesn't Mike and Cliff comment here a anymore?

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  45. Keeping the Troops in the Dark

    Bill Maher,

    Since this war began the number of soldiers in Iraq who think Saddam Hussein was responsible for 9/11 has stunned us all. We continue to be surprised by the number of troops over there who still think we're winning, convinced we're doing good, and that if America pulls out they will follow us home.


    The military sent to Iraq some of the most educated soldiers in a generation. More have high school degrees than those who served in Vietnam.

    But that doesn't mean they know anything. It's become obvious that the job of the Bush military is to keep our soldiers on a "need to know" state of alert.

    Which is why on Friday the Pentagon announced that soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan would no longer be able to use military computers to access You Tube, My Space and eleven other popular websites.

    Do soldiers deserve the truth? Or does that weaken them as soldiers? Does a well-informed military create a stronger army? Or just deserters? I think a well-informed army creates a civilian leadership that is forced to send them into harm's way based on facts.

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  46. Baghdad - Five U.S. soldiers were killed and nine wounded in separate attacks in Baghdad and the restive province of Diyala northeast of the capital, the U.S. military said Friday, and ABC News reported that two Iraqi journalists working for the network's Baghdad bureau were killed by gunmen while on their way home from work Thursday night.

    "Surge" on Bush.

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  47. Our brave troops have been exploited for political and commercial gain, that much is clear. In essence, they are being used not to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. Rather, they are being used - and I do mean USED - to allow the current administration to unravel the Constitution of the United States.

    The troops are just doing their jobs and living up to the commitments that they've made. That is honorable. What is NOT honorable is the manner in which the troops' loyalty and devotion is being bastardized for the benefit of contractors who are making billions of dollars off of their blood, sweat and tears. That, my friends, is nothing short of despicable. Utterly despicable.

    My new mantra is this:

    Love the Troops.
    F*** the War!

    May they come home soon. I have begun writing my congressman every time a new round of U.S. casualties appears in the news. It may sound like a broken record to my congressman, but so be it. They need to hear from us. All of us. Often. Please make a point to do this via www.house.gov. Write early. Write often. Right now!

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  48. Drewl, great comment. I was just thinking about you the other day. Great to hear from you.

    Holly, there are over 12 shows in the archives at www.bashamandcornell.com

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  49. Poll: American Satisfaction at New Low
    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


    WASHINGTON (AP) -- It's gloomy out there. Men and women, whites and minorities -- all are feeling a war-weary pessimism about the country seldom shared by so many people.

    Only 25 percent of those surveyed say things in the U.S. are going in the right direction, according to an AP-Ipsos poll this month. That is about the lowest level of satisfaction detected since the survey started in December 2003.

    Rarely have longer-running polls found such a rate since the even gloomier days of 1992 ahead of the first President Bush's re-election loss to Democrat Bill Clinton.

    The current glumness is widely blamed on public discontent with the war in Iraq and with President Bush. It is striking for how widespread the mood is among different groups of people.

    Women and minorities are less content than men and whites, which has been true for years. But all four groups are at or near record lows for the AP-Ipsos poll, and at unusually low levels for older surveys, as well.

    Three in 10 men and two in 10 women said this month they think the country is on the right track, down from nearly half of each who felt that way at the end of 2003.

    By race, 28 percent of whites and 18 percent of minorities said the same -- just over half their rates of optimism from late 2003.

    Asked in April why they felt things were veering in the wrong direction, one-third overall volunteered the war and one-fourth blamed poor leadership.

    Nine percent faulted the economy, 8 percent a loss of moral values and 5 percent gasoline prices.

    ''We need to get out of war, get our economy back up, quit spending money outside of America and bring it here,'' said Democrat Lisa Pollard, 45, an insurance company analyst in Arlington, Texas.

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  50. Suicide bomber blows up a tanker near a police station in Baghdad killing 4 and wounding 11.

    "Surge" on Bush.

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  51. BAGHDAD, May 19 — Gunmen wearing Iraqi Army uniforms dragged 15 Shiite Kurds into the street in an eastern Iraqi village and shot them dead on Saturday, Iraqi government officials said.

    "Surge" on Bush.

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  52. KHOST, Afghanistan (Reuters) - A suicide bomber killed 10 civilians and wounded at least 30 other people, including foreign troops, in a crowded market in southeastern Afghanistan on Sunday, officials said.

    Didn't Bush say he already won that war?

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  53. Lydia I have been trying to listen to yesterdays show in the archives but it will not connect. I think something is wrong with the connection.

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  54. I can't open it either Holly.

    It's a dead link.

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  55. Hey am I the only one who is sick of that self worshiping bloviated windbag George Will?

    His smug, pompous arrogance has dominated "This Week" since George Stephanoplis took over.

    Today, when Kristina Vandersomethingorother said with regards to the clandestine meeting with Ashcroft at the hospital, its not about Gonzales. It's about Bush", George Will smugly chuckeled and said, "no, its about Gonzales".

    He was being arrogant, and superior (as always) and then to my surprise, Farhid Zakaria joined in, as did Stephenopolis, chuckling, like she was nuts or something.

    Well lets see. Who's right here?

    Kristiana or George Will?

    Well, who was at the meeting?

    Robert Mueller who is the director of the FBI. A Bush appointee but ok, maybe not a direct link to the president.

    Alberto Gonzales, who at the time was the presidents lawyer, who also was a lifelong close friend to the President. Thats a much closer link I'd say.

    And Andrew Card.

    :|

    Now what does Card do again???

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  56. He's someones Chief of Staff, right?

    Whose Chief of Staff is he?

    Is he Dick Cheney's Chief of Staff?

    Maybe he's Condi Rice's Chief of Staff?


    Oh I know, maybe he's Barney's Chief of Staff...


    :|


    Help me out here.

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  57. See, George Will thinks himself erudite because he can artfully employ polysyllabic words in conversation.

    But when it comes to having an eye for the obvious, he is simply none too swift.

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  58. Another great post, Lydia. On the first part, while Jesus did teach these things, don't forget that his reaction to the religious and civil leaders exploiting his people was to drive their money changers from the temple.

    On the second, I agree with your sis. Bush does not support the troops. He fights to keep them from getting the best equipment, adequate health care, veterans benefits and even a tiny pay raise. True support for the troops is removing the targets Bush has placed on them. Compare the video in your post with the one in today's top article at my place.

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  59. Holly & Worf -- Oops I'll check the archives.

    Meanwhile I'm in the countdown phase of a big work project...

    Freedom soon!!

    I miss normal life; too much work.
    God Bless everyone.

    It seems impeachment is imminent.

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  60. Lydia Cornell said...
    Holly & Worf -- Oops I'll check the archives.

    Meanwhile I'm in the countdown phase of a big work project...

    Freedom soon!!

    I miss normal life; too much work.
    God Bless everyone.

    It seems impeachment is imminent."


    You deserve some time to relax Lydia........everyone needs some time to relax, do things they enjoy and recharge their battery........I took a 4 day weekend this weekend.

    Just keep up the radio show, I really enjoy it its so refreshing to actually hear people speak the truth and cover REAL news and not BS!

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  61. Hi Lydia!

    Don't work too hard on that project but we understand!

    We miss you! ;)

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  62. ANTIPIOUS WORFEUS said...
    Hey am I the only one who is sick of that self worshiping bloviated windbag George Will?

    His smug, pompous arrogance has dominated "This Week" since George Stephanoplis took over.

    Today, when Kristina Vandersomethingorother said with regards to the clandestine meeting with Ashcroft at the hospital, its not about Gonzales. It's about Bush", George Will smugly chuckeled and said, "no, its about Gonzales".

    He was being arrogant, and superior (as always) and then to my surprise, Farhid Zakaria joined in, as did Stephenopolis, chuckling, like she was nuts or something."

    I didnt watch any of George Stephenopolis, usually I flick back and forth between that and Meet The Press.............I should have watched that rather than Newt Gingrich acting like a smug pompous idiot whenever Chris Dood tried to say ANYTHING............that and the Ronald Reagan tribute........but Meet The Press wouldnt STILL cater to the Reich Wing now that the Democrats control Congress would they????????????

    Regarding George Will though I agree he is a pompous arrogant SOB, why he's on every single week i'll never know........I dont think he adds that much.

    And your Right whether the MSM wants to admit the truth or put their head in the sand and defend the Fuheror.................The truth is clear that GWB WAS involved and his minions were defying and attempting to circumvent the law at HIS behest.............AND THAT IS IMPEACHABLE!!!!

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  63. A little trouble between Pakistan and Afghanistan isn't a problem is it?

    Afghan soldiers mass on border, ready and willing to take on old foe

    In the late-morning lull that followed the thump of shellfire and chatter of machineguns, the preparations for a small war seemed to be unfolding in the orchards and paddy fields beneath the towering Spingar mountain range.

    Scores of heavily armed Afghan troops and fighters from special border police units – determined, professional and evidently spoiling for a fight – gathered around their senior officers for orders. Artillery men waited beside their 122mm field guns hidden among the mulberry groves. And in nearby village bazaars tribesmen clustered around their elders, asking for weapons of their own so that they could join the fray.

    Yet the enemy was not the Taleban, nor an infiltrating column of al-Qaeda fighters. Instead, in the remote border district of ’Ali Kheyl in eastern Afghanistan, Afghan security forces have found themselves pitted against an older and bigger enemy: Pakistan.

    Clashes between the two neighbours – two of the West’s biggest allies in the War on Terror – began here last Sunday morning when Paki-stani forces fired on an Afghan post at Toorgawe, a strategic point on the border. The fighting is the most serious of its kind for years.

    Since Sunday evening there has been a build-up of forces in the contested zone as hundreds of regular Afghan soldiers from the 203rd “Thunder” Corps, who had been fighting the Taleban, have deployed to the area to reinforce the beleaguered border police, bringing with them heavy artillery sent up from Kabul. “We can’t wait any more,” Brigadier Sanaoull Haq, a staff officer in the corps, said. “Now if anything further happens we will reply in kind.”

    Each side accuses the other of initiating the bombardments, which so far have left 13 Afghans dead and 51 wounded. Foreign diplomats in Kabul fear that the situation, which has united Afghan nationalist sentiment across every ethnic divide, may escalate. It threatens to wreck any semblance of security cooperation between the countries, to the detriment of Nato’s struggle with the Taliban.

    (snip)

    On Monday a joint Afgh-an-American delegation flew across the border for talks with Pakistani officers aimed at producing a ceasefire. The meeting was held in a schoolhouse in Teri Mangel, a small town in the Kurram tribal area of Pakistan. Yet after the negotiations concluded the delegation was fired upon. An American soldier was killed and four others wounded.

    Though Nato and Pakistan, keen to play down the incident, say the attack was the work of a single rogue member of a Pakistani militia, two Afghan delegates present as part of the delegation who were separately interviewed byThe Times, Governor Rahmatullah Rahman and Colonel Shamsur, say they were fired on by up to a dozen uniformed Pakistani militiamen.

    “There were two groups of Pakistani militia shooting at us,” said Governor Rahmatullah. “One group was placed among rocks and it fired at the delegation as it drove from the school to be picked up by a helicopter. The other group fired at the delegation’s security guards in the school’s courtyard. The attackers were in uniform. I saw at least ten.”

    Despite this attack, a border ceasefire held until Thursday, when renewed artillery exchanges began in the morning and lasted until midday. Though both the Pakistani militia in Kurram and the Afghans in ’Ali Kheyl are Pashtuns of the same Zazi tribe, their kinship seems to be no barrier to the desire to fight one another.



    Ya think Osama Bin Laden, al Quada, and the Taliban can take advantage of THIS situation?

    Ya think Georgie even understands the political implications of the two most important allies in the war on terra fighting, and the fact that they are fighting in the tribal areas where Osama and mullah Omar are hiding out?

    Ya think the neo-cons understand how bad NOT finishing the war in Afghanistan before invading Iraq is going to turn out to be?

    Probably not, but then again reichwinmgers ain't that bright after all.

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  64. Bush claimed he won the war in Afganistan and now they have killings everyday.

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  65. BAGHDAD, May 20 — Six American soldiers and their interpreter were killed by a roadside bomb in western Baghdad on Saturday, the military said Sunday, in one of the deadliest single attacks against American troops in the capital in recent months.

    The soldiers, whose names were not released, had been searching for insurgent arms caches, the military said in a statement

    "Surge" on Bush.

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  66. Larry it's not the individual killings but the out right military fighting between Afghanistan Forces and Pakistani Forces I worry about.

    Because usually when two countries use their militaries to squabble over a border we call it a war......

    ReplyDelete
  67. Pakistan also hates the U.S they just love the American dollar.

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  68. The Chinese government said today that it would acquire a $3 billion stake in the Blackstone Group, the private equity firm, in the country’s first effort to diversify its $1.2 trillion in foreign-exchange reserves beyond United States Treasury bills and into commercial enterprise.

    The deal, which is set to coincide with Blackstone’s $4 billion initial public offering this year, will give China a roughly 8 percent stake in Blackstone, which owns companies that have 375,000 employees and $83 billion in annual sales

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  69. CAMARILLO, Calif. - The average price of self-serve regular gasoline hit a record high of $3.18, rising more than 11 cents over the past two weeks, according to a nationwide survey released Sunday.

    More of the Bush economy.

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  70. Hi Guys! ;)

    CRAWFORD, Texas — In a biting rebuke, the White House on Sunday dismissed former President Jimmy Carter as "increasingly irrelevant" after his harsh criticism of President Bush.

    Carter was quoted Saturday as saying "I think as far as the adverse impact on the nation around the world, this administration has been the worst in history."

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  71. The White House has a lot of room to call someone irrelevant.

    Did they forget King George?

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  72. GARDEZ, Afghanistan - A suicide bomber apparently targeting a U.S. convoy killed 14 people and wounded 31 in a crowded eastern Afghan market Sunday, witnesses and officials said said.

    Didn't Bush boast of winning the war in Afganistan?

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  73. BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) -- The U.S. military added on Sunday more U.S. soldiers to the list of those who died in attacks on Saturday, bringing the number of American soldiers killed since Friday to 15.

    Also on Sunday, as part of its search for three missing American soldiers, the U.S. military said troops drained a canal after receiving a tip from local Shiite Iraqis that bodies had been dumped in the area. No clues of any interest were found.

    The three soldiers disappeared on May 12 after an attack in which four U.S. troops and one Iraqi soldier were killed. (Watch the canal that was drained in the U.S. search for missing troops )

    Of the 15 U.S. soldiers who died since Friday, eight were killed Saturday in roadside bomb attacks.

    "Surge" is really working Bush.

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  74. I find it difficult to sit through the tributes. It's gone from a sense of unease, to sadness, to a clawing sadness. I now understand the philosophy that says the death of every human being diminishes the rest of us.

    We would not be helpless if we would all come together as one and insist that this insanity be brought to an end. The "twenty percenters" couldn't stop us if they wanted to (and since they are all cowards, they wouldn't try very hard anyway.)

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  75. Larry it's not the individual killings but the out right military fighting between Afghanistan Forces and Pakistani Forces I worry about.

    Because usually when two countries use their militaries to squabble over a border we call it a war......


    I wrote about this some time back. Pakistan never was really a country (as 1971 will have taught anyone who remembers,) and the people they fought at the Afghan border without a doubt consisted of not a few people who make their homes within the borders of Pakistan.

    Pakistan is collapsing, and a great race will soon be on to seize those nukes. The Taliban (on the move inside Pakistan, and gaining strength daily) is in the running to make that grab.

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  76. Jolly:

    The sad thing is the masses haven't the backbone to stand up, because the Democrats haven't the backbone to lead the march to impeachment and withdrawal.

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  77. The Taliban will probably win the race for the nukes.

    With Bin Laden having wide support and Bush having hate and discord in the entire region, it is easy to see who will prevail.

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  78. Digg This Story
    Top 10 Signs of the Impending U.S. Police State - Replies: 0 | Views: 164


    SqlSpace - No Censorship Zone Forum Index -> Police State and Big Brother
    Author Message
    rebel_lonedog
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    Joined: 18 Oct 2004
    Posts: 9737
    Location: Ontario

    New Feature Copy Post Location :Post: #1 <-- image links directly
    Posted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 3:27 am Post subject: Top 10 Signs of the Impending U.S. Police State

    Is the U.S. becoming a police state? Here are the top 10 signs that it may well be the case.

    1. The Internet Clampdown

    One saving grace of alternative media in this age of unfettered corporate conglomeration has been the internet. While the masses are spoon-fed predigested news on TV and in mainstream print publications, the truth-seeking individual still has access to a broad array of investigative reporting and political opinion via the world-wide web. Of course, it was only a matter of time before the government moved to patch up this crack in the sky.

    Attempts to regulate and filter internet content are intensifying lately, coming both from telecommunications corporations (who are gearing up to pass legislation transferring ownership and regulation of the internet to themselves), and the Pentagon (which issued an "Information Operations Roadmap" in 2003, signed by Donald Rumsfeld, which outlines tactics such as network attacks and acknowledges, without suggesting a remedy, that US propaganda planted in other countries has easily found its way to Americans via the internet). One obvious tactic clearing the way for stifling regulation of internet content is the growing media frenzy over child pornography and "internet predators," which will surely lead to legislation that by far exceeds in its purview what is needed to fight such threats.

    2. "The Long War"

    This little piece of clumsy marketing died off quickly, but it gave away what many already suspected: the War on Terror will never end, nor is it meant to end. It is designed to be perpetual. As with the War on Drugs, it outlines a goal that can never be fully attained -- as long as there are pissed off people and explosives. The Long War will eternally justify what are ostensibly temporary measures: suspension of civil liberties, military expansion, domestic spying, massive deficit spending and the like. This short-lived moniker told us all, "get used to it. Things aren't going to change any time soon."

    3. The USA PATRIOT Act

    Did anyone really think this was going to be temporary? Yes, this disgusting power grab gives the government the right to sneak into your house, look through all your stuff and not tell you about it for weeks on a rubber stamp warrant. Yes, they can look at your medical records and library selections. Yes, they can pass along any information they find without probable cause for purposes of prosecution. No, they're not going to take it back, ever.

    [b]4. Prison Camps[/b]

    This last January the Army Corps of Engineers gave Halliburton subsidiary Kellogg Brown & Root nearly $400 million to build detention centers in the United States, for the purpose of unspecified "new programs." Of course, the obvious first guess would be that these new programs might involve rounding up Muslims or political dissenters -- I mean, obviously detention facilities are there to hold somebody. I wish I had more to tell you about this, but it's, you know... secret.

    5. Touchscreen Voting Machines

    Despite clear, copious evidence that these nefarious contraptions are built to be tampered with, they continue to spread and dominate the voting landscape, thanks to Bush's "Help America Vote Act," the exploitation of corrupt elections officials, and the general public's enduring cluelessness.

    In Utah, Emery County Elections Director Bruce Funk witnessed security testing by an outside firm on Diebold voting machines which showed them to be a security risk. But his warnings fell on deaf ears. Instead Diebold attorneys were flown to Emery County on the governor's airplane to squelch the story. Funk was fired. In Florida, Leon County Supervisor of Elections Ion Sancho discovered an alarming security flaw in their Diebold system at the end of last year. Rather than fix the flaw, Diebold refused to fulfill its contract. Both of the other two touchscreen voting machine vendors, Sequoia and ES&S, now refuse to do business with Sancho, who is required by HAVA to implement a touchscreen system and will be sued by his own state if he doesn't. Diebold is said to be pressuring for Sancho's ouster before it will resume servicing the county.

    Stories like these and much worse abound, and yet TV news outlets have done less coverage of the new era of elections fraud than even 9/11 conspiracy theories. This is possibly the most important story of this century, but nobody seems to give a damn. As long as this issue is ignored, real American democracy will remain an illusion. The midterm elections will be an interesting test of the public's continuing gullibility about voting integrity, especially if the Democrats don't win substantial gains, as they almost surely will if everything is kosher.

    Bush just suggested that his brother Jeb would make a good president. We really need to fix this problem soon.

    6. Signing Statements

    Bush has famously never vetoed a bill. This is because he prefers to simply nullify laws he doesn't like with "signing statements." Bush has issued over 700 such statements, twice as many as all previous presidents combined. A few examples of recently passed laws and their corresponding dismissals, courtesy of the Boston Globe:
    Quote:

    --Dec. 30, 2005: US interrogators cannot torture prisoners or otherwise subject them to cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment.

    Bush's signing statement: The president, as commander in chief, can waive the torture ban if he decides that harsh interrogation techniques will assist in preventing terrorist attacks.

    --Dec. 30, 2005: When requested, scientific information ''prepared by government researchers and scientists shall be transmitted [to Congress] uncensored and without delay."

    Bush's signing statement: The president can tell researchers to withhold any information from Congress if he decides its disclosure could impair foreign relations, national security, or the workings of the executive branch.

    --Dec. 23, 2004: Forbids US troops in Colombia from participating in any combat against rebels, except in cases of self-defense. Caps the number of US troops allowed in Colombia at 800.

    Bush's signing statement: Only the president, as commander in chief, can place restrictions on the use of US armed forces, so the executive branch will construe the law ''as advisory in nature."


    Essentially, this administration is bypassing the judiciary and deciding for itself whether laws are constitutional or not. Somehow, I don't see the new Supreme Court lineup having much of a problem with that, though. So no matter what laws congress passes, Bush will simply choose to ignore the ones he doesn't care for. It's much quieter than a veto, and can't be overridden by a two-thirds majority. It's also totally absurd.

    7. Warrantless Wiretapping

    Amazingly, the GOP sees this issue as a plus for them. How can this be? What are you, stupid? You find out the government is listening to the phone calls of US citizens, without even the weakest of judicial oversight and you think that's okay? Come on -- if you know anything about history, you know that no government can be trusted to handle something like this responsibly. One day they're listening for Osama, and the next they're listening in on Howard Dean.

    Think about it: this administration hates unauthorized leaks. With no judicial oversight, why on earth wouldn't they eavesdrop on, say, Seymour Hersh, to figure out who's spilling the beans? It's a no-brainer. Speaking of which, it bears repeating: terrorists already knew we would try to spy on them. They don't care if we have a warrant or not. But you should.

    8. Free Speech Zones

    I know it's old news, but... come on, are they fucking serious?

    9. High-ranking Whistleblowers

    Army Generals. Top-level CIA officials. NSA operatives. White House cabinet members. These are the kind of people that Republicans fantasize about being, and whose judgment they usually respect. But for some reason, when these people resign in protest and criticize the Bush administration en masse, they are cast as traitorous, anti-American publicity hounds. Ridiculous. The fact is, when people who kill, spy and deceive for a living tell you that the White House has gone too far, you had damn well better pay attention. We all know most of these people are staunch Republicans. If the entire military except for the two guys the Pentagon put in front of the press wants Rumsfeld out, why on earth wouldn't you listen?

    10. The CIA Shakeup

    Was Porter Goss fired because he was resisting the efforts of Rumsfeld or Negroponte? No. These appointments all come from the same guys, and they wouldn't be nominated if they weren't on board all the way. Goss was probably canned so abruptly due to a scandal involving a crooked defense contractor, his hand-picked third-in-command, the Watergate hotel and some hookers.

    If Bush's nominee for CIA chief, Air Force General Michael Hayden, is confirmed, that will put every spy program in Washington under military control. Hayden, who oversaw the NSA warrantless wiretapping program and is clearly down with the program. That program? To weaken and dismantle or at least neuter the CIA. Despite its best efforts to blame the CIA for "intelligence errors" leading to the Iraq war, the picture has clearly emerged -- through extensive CIA leaks -- that the White House's analysis of Saddam's destructive capacity was not shared by the Agency. This has proved to be a real pain in the ass for Bush and the gang.

    Who'd have thought that career spooks would have moral qualms about deceiving the American people? And what is a president to do about it? Simple: make the critical agents leave, and fill their slots with Bush/Cheney loyalists. Then again, why not simply replace the entire organization? That is essentially what both Rumsfeld at the DoD and newly minted Director of National Intelligence John are doing -- they want to move intelligence analysis into the hands of people that they can control, so the next time they lie about an "imminent threat" nobody's going to tell. And the press is applauding the move as a "necessary reform."

    Remember the good old days, when the CIA were the bad guys?

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  79. Posted: Tue May 30, 2006 6:25 pm Post subject: Court rules no whistle-blower free-speech right

    A closely divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that government whistle-blowers are not protected by free-speech rights when they face employer discipline for trying to expose possible misconduct at work.

    By a 5-4 vote, the high court ruled against a California prosecutor who said he was demoted, denied a promotion and transferred for trying to expose a lie by a county sheriff's deputy in a search-warrant affidavit.

    Adopting the position of the Los Angeles prosecutor's office and the U.S. Justice Department, the high court ruled that a public employee has no First Amendment right in speech expressed as part of performing job-required duties.

    Writing for the court majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy said there is protection for whistle-blowers in federal and state laws and rules of conduct for government attorneys.

    The case had been closely watched for its affect on the at-work, free-speech rights of the nation's 21 million public employees. About 100 cases involving internal communications are brought each year in federal court.

    Steven Shapiro of the American Civil Liberties Union said, "In an age of excessive government secrecy, the Supreme Court has made it easier to engage in a government cover-up by discouraging internal whistle-blowing."

    Other ACLU officials predicted the ruling will deter government employees from speaking out about wrongdoing for fear of losing their jobs.

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  80. Mike:

    That is exactly what has happened and it points to the inevitable is closer than we think.

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  81. By Ellen Nakashima
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Tuesday, March 27, 2007; Page D01

    Private businesses such as rental and mortgage companies and car dealers are checking the names of customers against a list of suspected terrorists and drug traffickers made publicly available by the Treasury Department, sometimes denying services to ordinary people whose names are similar to those on the list.

    The Office of Foreign Asset Control's list of "specially designated nationals" has long been used by banks and other financial institutions to block financial transactions of drug dealers and other criminals. But an executive order issued by President Bush after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks has expanded the list and its consequences in unforeseen ways. Businesses have used it to screen applicants for home and car loans, apartments and even exercise equipment, according to interviews and a report by the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area to be issued today.

    "The way in which the list is being used goes far beyond contexts in which it has a link to national security," said Shirin Sinnar, the report's author. "The government is effectively conscripting private businesses into the war on terrorism but doing so without making sure that businesses don't trample on individual rights."

    The lawyers' committee has documented at least a dozen cases in which U.S. customers have had transactions denied or delayed because their names were a partial match with a name on the list, which runs more than 250 pages and includes 3,300 groups and individuals. No more than a handful of people on the list, available online, are U.S. citizens.

    Yet anyone who does business with a person or group on the list risks penalties of up to $10 million and 10 to 30 years in prison, a powerful incentive for businesses to comply. The law's scope is so broad and guidance so limited that some businesses would rather deny a transaction than risk criminal penalties, the report finds.

    "The law is ridiculous," said Tom Hudson, a lawyer in Hanover, Md., who advises car dealers to use the list to avoid penalties. "It prohibits anyone from doing business with anyone who's on the list. It does not have a minimum dollar amount. . . . The local deli, if it sells a sandwich to someone whose name appears on the list, has violated the law."

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  82. Bush NEEDS to Be impeached before he destroys this country like he destroys everything he touches!

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  83. Home prices: from sizzle to simmer

    By Elizabeth Rhodes and Justin Mayo
    Seattle Times staff reporters

    With real-estate markets across the country reeling, Seattle-area homeowners may have a hard time getting any sympathy from distant relatives when they talk about how much the market has cooled off here.

    After 2 ½ years of double-digit increases, King County's single-family home appreciation peaked early last year. But at 16 percent for the year, the increase in home prices for 2006 handily beat the previous five years' annual average: 9 percent. The same was true in the southern half of Snohomish County.

    So far this year, King County's appreciation rate has dropped to 13 percent

    More of the Bush economy.

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  84. Pelosi refuses to bring impeachment. She would rather embrace a new "free trade" deal that trades U.S jobs for Corporate dollars.

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  85. On Saturday, gasoline prices in Milwaukee climbed to a record average high of $3.43 a gallon. And concerns about global warming and reliance on foreign oil continue to grow.


    More of the Bush economy.

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  86. I paid $3.50 a gallon yesterday Larry.............Thats the most i've EVER paid..................it will hit $4 a gallon this summer.

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  87. The Rev. Jerry Falwell's son told thousands of parishioners packed in a church Sunday that the man they remembered as a mighty force in conservative Christianity would want them to continue the work he began.

    That's all we need, two more neocons carrying on the family tradition of justifying their own political and personal agendas through the Church.

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  88. It hit $4 a gallon in Aspen Colorado yesterday.

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  89. I think the Oil companies are stealing and price gouging as much as possible while GWB and his thugs and cronies are still in power................HELL, the illegal war and invassion of Iraq was the oil companies and GWB's oil cronnies.

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  90. Gas prices have risen 78% in the past 5 years.

    Bush the oil man, has been in office for 6 years.

    See any connection?

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  91. I agree Mike:

    Prices will be outlandish until the oilcon is either impeached or his term expires, and face it, they won't impeach him.

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  92. Larry said...
    It hit $4 a gallon in Aspen Colorado yesterday."

    If energy independence from the oil robber barons doesnt become an election issue this summer..............then we need new candidates...............EVERY single candidate should have a viable energy policy!

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  93. Larry said...
    Gas prices have risen 78% in the past 5 years.

    Bush the oil man, has been in office for 6 years.

    See any connection?"


    That must be an old statistic Larry, I remember gas was between $1-$1.50 4-6 years ago.......thats more like a 250% rise rather than a 78% rise.

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  94. Mike:

    I think gas will be above $4 by July 4th all over the country.

    More will lose their jobs and homes and Bush and his oil buddies will still profit.

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  95. I don't now. I saw it on MSNBC this week unless it was referring to something else.

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  96. I think Cheney's "SECRET" meetings with the Oil Company Robber Barons should be made public................course they'll fight that tooth and nail since the treason leading up to the illegal war will be laid bare if those meetings are made public!

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  97. If someone would ever unravel the secrets of this bunch, there would be more than impeachment awaiting.

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  98. Two Words gentlemen;

    PEAK OIL

    Cheney ET AL know all about it and are trying to grab all they can till the whole shebang collapses because of shrinking energy resources, and those with access at the end will end up ruling the rest of us.....

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  99. Cheney, being the moronic dolt that he is, hasn't even considered that he's probably singlehandedly created an American version of Hugo Chavez.

    I am certain he has. Whether the Hugo in waiting rules the whole country, or just part of it, remains to be seen. Sadly, my money's on only part of it.

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  100. Cheney is an incompetent fool that has been dead wrong about basically EVERYTHING he has EVER said..............why ANYONE would listen to this fool is beyond me!

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  101. New thread is up, but I really want to discuss the Monica Goodling and Gonzales scandals, as they pertain to the missing Rove emails

    Does anyone have an update on this? Please post on the new thread, which I just re-titled, UNIFIED FIELD.

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