Friday, October 20, 2006

FBI INVESTIGATING VOTING CODE THEFT

WASH POST: DIEBOLD TOUCHSCREEN SOURCE CODE DISCOVERED STOLEN IN MARYLAND!
ALSO: State Report Finds Sensitive Voter Registration Database Vulnerable to 'Across-the-Board Access'
Diebold, State Election Director Lamone Continue State of Denial…

The Washington Post is reporting in Friday editions that the FBI is investigating the "possible theft" of Diebold electronic touch-screen voting system source code in Maryland.

While the Maryland State Board of Elections admits that the disks contained "the software…used in Maryland in the 2004 elections," Diebold denies everything. Of course. They gave their catch-all apologia — the software is for "versions…that are no longer in use in Maryland" — although they were forced to acknowledge "the version of one program apparently stored on the disks is still in use in 'a limited number of jurisdictions.'"...

COMPLETE DETAILS

This from Marcus, our soldier in Iraq:

Whoever that guy was that said we dealt with Iraq in "stupidity" and "ignorance" finally got it right. I thought we were about to come into some real honesty in this debate. But...he retracted his statements. Doesnt matter though they have already been broadcast on Al Jazeera.
I felt better if only for a minute. It scares me that they are just going to deny reality all the way unitl the end. Just keep denying. It doesnt matter what everyone else says I guess they have made no mistakes. The end of what...I dont know. The Iraq Debacle, the elections, the world perhaps.

Kokomo...big UAW town. The factories span US 31 from the north side to the center of the city. My dads in the UAW. You dont know how much our quality of life improved once my Dad got the union gig at Rolls Royce Engines.

633 comments:

  1. Diplomat Cites U.S. 'Stupidity' in Iraq

    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Published: October 22, 2006
    BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP)

    A senior U.S. diplomat said the United States had shown ''arrogance'' and ''stupidity'' in Iraq but was now ready to talk with any group except Al-Qaida in Iraq to facilitate national reconciliation.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Worfeus we have not learned the NEW Diebold math yet.

    It actually is really simple to learn all democratic votes are less than all republican votes -1, no matter what the variables on either side of the equation.

    algebracically it looks like this;

    R-1>D

    Test Two weeks from now, study hard.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yeah Clif,
    or the code may work like this;

    R-X>SumDvariablex0

    this way it doesn't matter how few Rethugs vote they will still outnumber Dems if all Dems vote


    Watcha reckon to Bill Maher? I think he's as good as Olbermann and Jon Stewart. He recently attacked PNAC with this;

    "And finally, new rule in two parts: (A) You can't call yourself a think tank if all your ideas are stupid; and (B) If you're someone from one of these think tanks that dreamed up the Iraq War and who predicted that we'd be greeted as liberators, and that we wouldn't need a lot of troops, and that Iraqi oil would pay for the war, that the WMD's would be found, that the looting wasn't problematic, that the mission was accomplished, that the insurgency was in its last throes, that things would get better after the people voted, after the government was formed, after we got Saddam, after we got his kids, after we got Zarqawi, and that whole bloody mess wouldn't turn into a civil war, you have to stop making predictions."

    then this;

    "Iraq was a noble experiment...our intention was good......

    to penetrate Iraq and bring it to a glorious, euphoric climax.....

    but it’s clear now that’s just not going to happen and yet we’re still POUNDING AWAY.......

    causing the whole area to become painfully inflamed and in that situation the kindest thing you can do is just.....

    PULL OUT."
    - Bill Maher

    ReplyDelete
  4. Just got back from Kokomo Indiana, where I got to be a guest on Larry's radio show, as well as Allan James morning drive show, plus several other interviews. Robert Dreyfuss from Rolling Stone joined me. Larry is a great human being and does a lot of mission work for the homeless.

    Also did interviews for the newspapers there, and will be writing a regular column for the main newspaper. Great town and great people, especially the labor unions. Met the wonderful Sona head of the UAW!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Lydia, sounds like you had a really busy weekend.

    What were you talking about?

    ReplyDelete
  6. here's another great quote:

    “Things have gotten so bad for the Republicans that were President Bush to unveil Osama bin Laden’s corpse in the Rose Garden, some reporter would instantly check to see if his last meal had been on Jack Abramoff’s tab.” - Frank Rich

    ReplyDelete
  7. From Daily Kos;

    [Michigan Rep. John Dingell]--now 80 years old and more ornery than ever--is all but certain to return to his old job. After 12 long, frustrating years as the panel's ranking minority member, a title that left him little more than the power to complain, nothing animates Dingell more than the thought of making up for lost time.

    Dingell is careful to say he is not out to get George W. Bush, or the Republicans, and insists he will extend his hand to his GOP colleagues and conduct "oversight thoughtfully and responsibly." He says "there's no list" of things he wants to investigate. But in the next breath, he quickly ticks off a list of things he wants to investigate:
    1. The Bush administration's handling of port security and the threat of nuclear smuggling;
    2. computer privacy;
    3. climate change;
    4. concentration of media ownership;
    5. the new Medicare Part D program, which he calls a "massive scandal," and
    6. the secret meetings of Vice President Dick Cheney's energy task force.
    "This is a hardheaded administration," Dingell says. "So we'll probably have lots of hearings."

    The House of Representatives is full of John Dingell Democrats--exiled committee chairmen awaiting the day they can reclaim the center chair on the dais. All carry lists--if only in their heads--of issues and outrages they believe Republicans have failed to probe because such questions would be politically embarrassing to the president.
    Henry Waxman of California is another Democratic old-timer whose ire never dims. A tireless investigator, he's in line to head the Government Reform Committee, and plans to take aim at
    7. Halliburton and alleged rip-offs and contract abuse in Iraq.

    Then there's Charles Rangel, the New York congressman who's never met a cable show he didn't like. He is set to take over the Ways and Means Committee, and wants to take a hard look at
    8. the Bush tax cuts.

    John Conyers of Michigan has waited for years to head the Judiciary Committee. He's likely to convene hearings on the
    9. Patriot Act and domestic wiretapping.
    In the past, he has suggested the possibility of impeachment hearings for President Bush.
    "When the Clinton administration was in office, there was no accusation too small for the Republicans to rush out the subpoenas," Waxman says. "When Bush became president, there wasn't a scandal big enough for them to ignore."

    whoooooohooooooo

    GREAT SCOTT I'm looking forward to the next two years!

    ReplyDelete
  8. "He says "there's no list" of things he wants to investigate. But in the next breath, he quickly ticks off a list of things he wants to investigate:..."

    Gee, did he vote FOR it before he voted AGAINST it?

    Typical two faced lib...

    ReplyDelete
  9. yeah Doltron, kinda like Bush saying he is not spying on all Americans, or he doesnt believe in torture, or there are no secret prisons.....................oh and lets not forget Mark Foley saying he wants to protect kids from sexual predators.......you big brave repuggies keep talking out of the side of your mouth saying you are our only hope to protect us from evil............whose gonna protect us from you fools?

    ReplyDelete
  10. No really, we should listen to the republicans.


    Lets all just go to the polls next month and vote for our congress on computers that have been repeatedly demonstrated to be subject to all sorts of tampering.

    And while we're at it, lets just make sure there is no paper trail.

    That makes sense.

    ReplyDelete
  11. AH! A Deceptagon!

    ReplyDelete
  12. After all, looks like the Iraqi's aren't getting any, so why should we?

    ReplyDelete
  13. I know. Lets just all vote over the Intenet.

    After all thats how they chose who wins American Idol.

    Lets just do a TV show, where the candidates are voted off by the viewers. The home viewers can use the Internet and we can give gamepads to the studio audience.

    ReplyDelete
  14. We can call it, "Who wants to be Commander in Cheif".

    ReplyDelete
  15. Regis Philbin could be the debate moderator. Yea, and besides debates, we could like, ask them questions and stuff. You know, see if they're really smart.

    We could have like a "presidential Jeopardy round" where they have to answer questions on a broad range of topics.

    "uhhh....I'll take international ballistic missile treatys for a 1000 Alex"

    ReplyDelete
  16. Yeah, we could ask 'em important stuff, like wether they wear boxers or briefs...

    Or if they ever smoked pot but never inhaled...

    ReplyDelete
  17. Alex: "The catagory is MidTerms

    What single magor strategy is the RNC counting on to help win the fall elections?



    "uh...what is Gerrymandering Alex?"

    ReplyDelete
  18. Buzzer sounds:

    Alex:"sorry that is incorrect. Candidate number 2?"

    Candidate #2:"uhhh, what is computerized voting Alex?".

    Alex:"Correct.

    And I'm being told we would have also accepted 'Diebold Machines'."
    .

    ReplyDelete
  19. "Voltron" and "Worftron"???

    You guys sniffin model glue or something......lol?

    My masterpiece(latest video) is close to completion..... please, no applause!

    Hmmmmmmm.......wonder if the very vivacious Ms.Cornell mentioned the mighty Moo on one of those radio shows?

    Certainly, Im worthy......at least thats what my Psychiatrist told me?

    ReplyDelete
  20. Johnny, I believe the kiddies call it "huffing", and yes Worfs on something.

    Maybe aerioplane glue.....LOL

    ReplyDelete
  21. Wonder if thats where they got the title for the "Huffing"ton Post?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Alex: "The catagory is 'Rubbernecking' for $500"

    "What is the republican congress's official policy on dealing with child molestion in its ranks?".


    Candidate #1:"What is 'appoint them to a governing body in charge of child molesters"?

    ReplyDelete
  23. Alex: "Sorry that is incorrect."

    Candidate #2:"What is 'Don't ask, Don't tell', Alex?"

    ReplyDelete
  24. I thought all the good dictatorships of modern times always had elections that were tampered with? You know, The Party (refer to George Orwell's books 1984) wants to remain in control and loves being the dictators who can torture and do whatever they want, so making sure the electronic voting machines flip the vote internally on the harddrive at the precise time is essential for The Party to remain in power!

    All dictatorships are like that...welcome to the United Fascist States.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Those who are squealing with delight that our system of democracy (voting) has been rigged and hacked are the TRUE TRAITORS OF AMERICA.

    The End.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hey Worf,

    Politics aside for a moment please.

    You claim to know a little about computers and networks and I need to ask a question.

    In my email this evening I got a message where a email I suppossedly sent to someone at AOL was "undeliverable". Trouble is, I NEVER sent it, and I don't even know the person it was supposed to go to.
    (leven11@aol.com in case someone might recognize the s/n)

    It looks like it came from blogger and the subject line was Lydia Cornell.

    This has to be something outside my personal computer because I wasn't home this evening and my personal computer wasn't even turned on, let alone online.

    I can post the text if you think it'd help.

    -Thanx

    ReplyDelete
  27. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Sorry for the double, blogger burpped.

    ReplyDelete
  29. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  30. How do you KNOW Bush is LYING, his lips are moving;

    Bush: ‘We’ve Never Been Stay The Course’

    During an interview today on ABC’s This Week, President Bush tried to distance himself from what has been his core strategy in Iraq for the last three years. George Stephanopoulos asked about James Baker’s plan to develop a strategy for Iraq that is “between ’stay the course’ and ‘cut and run.’”

    Bush responded, ‘We’ve never been stay the course, George!’

    Bush is wrong:

    BUSH: We will stay the course. [8/30/06]

    BUSH: We will stay the course, we will complete the job in Iraq. [8/4/05]

    BUSH: We will stay the course until the job is done, Steve. And the temptation is to try to get the President or somebody to put a timetable on the definition of getting the job done. We’re just going to stay the course. [12/15/03]

    BUSH: And my message today to those in Iraq is: We’ll stay the course. [4/13/04]

    BUSH: And that’s why we’re going to stay the course in Iraq. And that’s why when we say something in Iraq, we’re going to do it. [4/16/04]

    BUSH: And so we’ve got tough action in Iraq. But we will stay the course. [4/5/04]


    Does he NOT KNOW they video tape him and KEEP the Tapes....for a LONG time?

    Why LIE like he does?

    Doesn't he KNOW LYING is a SIN?

    It's on that list of ten things we are NOT supposed to do............

    ReplyDelete
  31. Sorry about that, I just searched the street address. Post deleted.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Don't know what to tell you Volt.

    Quit spamming.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Go ahead though and post the entire text.

    It might help.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Voltron said...
    Sorry about that, I just searched the street address. Post deleted


    You mean you didn't know VenusFlix is Lydia's company? Its plastered all over the website. And her movie she made was the Venus Conspiracy.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I will tell you this though.

    If your PC got infected with a virus, and pushed it up to your mailbox on your ISP's mail server, (and if your ISP sucks), then a worm or virus could be sending emails to everyone in your address book, and everyone you ever sent a message to or received a message from. These emails could be for many reasons, the most likely, to propagate the worm.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Chances are you accidently clicked on a mailto link on her website, and accedentally hit "send" or "enter" when you were trying to close Outlook or Outlook express.

    I could see that happening.

    ReplyDelete
  37. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  38. The original message was received at Sun, 22 Oct 2006 18:19:35 -0400 (EDT)
    from ftpout.blogger.com [66.102.15.83]


    *** ATTENTION ***

    Your e-mail is being returned to you because there was a problem with its
    delivery. The address which was undeliverable is listed in the section
    labeled: "----- The following addresses had permanent fatal errors -----".

    The reason your mail is being returned to you is listed in the section
    labeled: "----- Transcript of Session Follows -----".

    The line beginning with "<<<" describes the specific reason your e-mail could
    not be delivered. The next line contains a second error message which is a
    general translation for other e-mail servers.

    Please direct further questions regarding this message to your e-mail
    administrator.

    --AOL Postmaster



    ----- The following addresses had permanent fatal errors -----
    leven11@aol.com

    ----- Transcript of session follows -----
    .... while talking to air-yj03.mail.aol.com.:
    >>> RCPT To:leven11@aol.com
    <<< 552 leven11 MAILBOX FULL
    554 leven11@aol.com... Service unavailable

    ATTACHED FILES INLINE DISPLAY

    Attached text follows, filename: .txt


    Reporting-MTA: dns; rly-yj04.mx.aol.com
    Arrival-Date: Sun, 22 Oct 2006 18:19:35 -0400 (EDT)
    Final-Recipient: RFC822; leven11@aol.com
    Action: failed
    Status: 5.2.2
    Remote-MTA: DNS; air-yj03.mail.aol.com
    Diagnostic-Code: SMTP; 552 leven11 MAILBOX FULL
    Last-Attempt-Date: Sun, 22 Oct 2006 18:19:40 -0400 (EDT)

    Attached text follows, filename: Oct22-1.txt


    Received: from blogger.com (ftpout.blogger.com [66.102.15.83]) by rly-yj04.mx.aol.com (v113.6) with ESMTP id MAILRELAYINYJ43-80d453bee773ce; Sun, 22 Oct 2006 18:19:35 -0400
    Received: from bla32.blogger.com (unknown [10.20.1.243])
    by blogger.com (Postfix) with ESMTP id E3ECB19653
    for leven11@aol.co>; Sun, 22 Oct 2006 15:26:24 -0700 (PDT)
    Message-ID: <11355625.1161555984926.JavaMail.root@bla32.blogger.com>
    From: Voltron xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.com
    To: leven11@aol.com
    Subject: [Lydia Cornell] 10/22/2006 03:25:02 PM
    Mime-Version: 1.0
    Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
    Date: Sun, 22 Oct 2006 15:26:24 -0700 (PDT)
    X-AOL-IP: 66.102.15.83
    X-AOL-SCOLL-SCORE: 1:2:443256323:14441827
    X-AOL-SCOLL-URL_COUNT: 1

    ReplyDelete
  39. Well I found the Venus Films site when I searched for "leven11@aol.com".

    It didn't quite hit me at first.

    Like I said though, it looks like blogger sent the email?

    My security is pretty tight. I use Trend Micro for antivirus along with Spybot and Spyware Blaster.

    I browse with Firefox and I use Pocomail as my email client, it doesn't run any activex or java. It uses it's own native "pocoscript".

    Believe me, my computer doesn't hiccup without me knowing when and why.

    ReplyDelete
  40. So the question I suppose is,

    Why is blogger emailing something to (venus films???) something supposedly from me regarding Lydia?

    ReplyDelete
  41. Yes Voltron.

    Maybe the FBI is using Carnivore on your email, and spying on you.

    Patriot act gave them that right you know.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Looks like it tried about 4 times too.

    ReplyDelete
  43. But I'm sure you're down with that, so don't worry. Its your buddies.

    ReplyDelete
  44. They could be transferring your files up via SMTP transfer, and reviewing what you've been up to.

    You know Lydia's been investigating hacking, so that makes sense, no?

    ReplyDelete
  45. Please excuse Voltron Ladies and Gentlemen.

    He's busy mircowaving his harddrive.

    ReplyDelete
  46. EGAD! You mean I might be "tainted" by just talking to you guys?

    ReplyDelete
  47. BTW, if there is anything in that email I posted that shouldn't be out in the open, say so and I'll delete that too.

    ReplyDelete
  48. LoL.

    Don't do anything drastic buddy, I'm just funnin ya.

    That was just a load of malarky, they don't operate that way.

    Chances are, you, or someone submitted a comment from the email option on the main blog page and it looks like her mailbox there is full, so it bounced back.

    Someone could be impersonating you, in blogger, and the return to address will still be yours, so you'll see the non delivery report.

    ReplyDelete
  49. And like I said before, my security is pretty good. They might be able to read my email over the net, but if anyone were in my computer I would know.

    ReplyDelete
  50. No, I see you xx'd your email address out, lol.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Well it's on my profile if you really want to know...LOL

    Just don't everybody flood my in box.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Voltron said...
    And like I said before, my security is pretty good. They might be able to read my email over the net, but if anyone were in my computer I would know.


    Not neccesarily.

    You strike me as someone playing dumb but likely know just a 'wee bit' more than you're letting on.

    But either way I could care less. I'm tired of the skullduggery bs.

    I'll take you at your face value and if you're being dishonest then shame on you, not me. Anyway unless you're running TripWire or COPS or something along those lines then your computer can be hacked without you ever knowing.

    Everytime you connect to a website, you are opening whats known as a 'socket connection' with a website. A socket is just a technical term for an network addresss bound to a layer 4 port and some upper layer protocols.

    What that means is its like inviting someone into your home. Socket connections are "2 way", and theres all kinds of ways people can push malicious code to you if you connect to their site.

    The fact that you run spyware and such is fine, but that stuff is only as good as its latest definitions. Something breaks in the wild, and your spyware programs may not even see it. And as for the government, well, investigate "magic lantern" (at your own peril) and you'll see where that lies.

    Anyway I'm sure your fine, its probably someone messing with you.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Well I know I didn't hit the email button, so that leaves someone (or somebot) impersonating me.

    They haven't done it yet on this board though, maybe I should check and see if I've posted anywhere I haven't.

    ReplyDelete
  54. Maybe.

    It might be Lydia's having all of the comments in her forwarded to that mailbox and it just got full.

    Thats a good bet.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Of course, then everybody would be getting them.

    So rule that out.

    ReplyDelete
  56. I'm not exactly "dumb", I know my computer inside and out, and can generally fix anything that goes wrong. I'm stronger on the hardware side than the software side.

    That said, I'm not necessarily a pro either. In high school I learned basic and a little fortran, and then since I never used it, forgot it. Love those old TRS 80's!

    I think I'm smart enough to learn programming and/or hacking if I had a strong interest, but I don't.

    So...??

    ReplyDelete
  57. LOL thats priceless DOLT......maybe the DOD is hacking you DOLTY HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    You know maybe your RNC buddies or the DOD figure you been hanging out here so long your one of us.........................but like Worf said you guys are cool with the "DECIDER" being able to spy on people to catch bad guys, what did you bastions of Freedom say, if you have nothing to hide whats the big deal right.......what o you guys call it again? oh yeah neccessary tools to catch bad guys.
    \

    I have to say Dolt you sure sound like a conspiracy kook claiming that your computer is being hacked LOL. ARE YOU WEARING A TINFOIL HAT DOLTY???

    ReplyDelete
  58. The Carnivore project came out of the Clinton administration, FYI. Just Google "clinton carnivore."

    ReplyDelete
  59. Voltron said;

    So...??

    So nothing.

    Basic. Fortran? Tandy TRS 80?

    Not exactly a 'novice', thats for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  60. TalllTexan said...
    The Carnivore project came out of the Clinton administration, FYI. Just Google "clinton carnivore."


    TT, on my worst day I know more about carny than you on your best. Unless of course you're a fed, or something.

    ReplyDelete
  61. I know a little about "sockets" although not much. Just what I've read on Steve Gibsons site about Windows XP being released with "raw sockets".

    You ever been to his site?
    www.grc.com

    Does all his programming in assembly.
    He has some neat programs and they're all very small (kb wise).

    Every now and then I run "shields up" and "leak test" just to make sure I'm not very visible and have no ports open that shouldn't be.

    ReplyDelete
  62. And we weren't talking Clinton\Bush.

    Voltron asked for help, and I was being neighborly.

    so you can GOTO you know where.

    ReplyDelete
  63. Sure Volt. I've followed Gibsons work for years.

    He was even on Leo Laporte's show a few times, but I've been using SPINRITE since it first came out.

    ReplyDelete
  64. LOL TT and the other repugs are so incompetent they are hacking and pushing malware on the wrong peoples computers, what do they say about evil always turning on itself.

    But Dolty you sound kinda paranoid buddy take off the tin foil hat, take a deep breath, crack a beer and relax, the jack booted thugs arent coming to get you at 3AM.

    Just remember Dolt, if you are having your privacy invaded and being hacked just remember that these are neccessary tools to protect us from evil doers and no true patriot would question that LOL...............................even i'm choking on this BS.

    maybe TT or Johnny is trying to spoof your e-mail to make you the fall guy Dolt.

    ReplyDelete
  65. He's a smart guy, although shields up is little more than a port scanner.

    You can do that yourself and much more if you know how.

    And something tells me you do.

    ReplyDelete
  66. Holy cow. Carnivore is pass'e.
    Heard of "DragonWare Suite"?

    ReplyDelete
  67. why is it all you brave reich wing patriots are computer programmers, did Colter recruit you to go to liberal blogs and play games?

    ReplyDelete
  68. Actually I don't.

    But if I wanted to, I could probably find out.

    I'm sure someone makes some software that does all that.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Oh Look the prince of darkness TT just showed up when we are talking about a hacking......................Do you think it was the DOD TT. common tell dolt to take of the Tin Foil Hat HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    I'm enjoying the WAY TOO MUCH!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  70. DO you even know what Carnivore is Volt?

    ReplyDelete
  71. Voltron said...

    But if I wanted to, I could probably find out.


    Yea. I bet it helps to have connections at the NSA.

    They've got some of the best in the world over there.

    ReplyDelete
  72. Worf,

    Regarding my intelligence (or lack thereof), I seem to be smart enough to learn anything I have an interest in, and I also seem to be smart enough to know where to look to satisfy that interest.

    That said, you may rest assured that there are a lot of things that I really have no interest in.

    ReplyDelete
  73. I just read the "How stuff works" page on it. That was where I found out about "DragonSuite".

    It was basically a "packet sniffer".
    (I understand the concept, but I have no experience with the function of one.)

    ReplyDelete
  74. LOL Mikey,

    I gonna let you enjoy that after all the crap we gave you when you went off.

    (I was more concerned about the blogger network though than my own computer.)

    ReplyDelete
  75. Thats right. It was a sniffer or protocol analyzer which is the actual name. A sniffer with a script, that pulls SMTP messages off into a buffer for later viewing.

    Nothing fancy.

    It worked great, till encryption became popular.

    Protocol Analyzers can't decode encryption.

    ReplyDelete
  76. Hey TT did you get hacked also.............man the DOD and NSA are running amuck, you brave patriots must feel safer knowing that they are turning over every rock to catch evil doers................you clowns dont believe in warrants, or evidence what we need is a witch hunt full steam a head, I say we bring back the dunking chairs to test if someone the "DECIDER" or his cronnies label a terrorist, really is, if the person drowns, then "mission accomplished" you killed a terrorist and if the person doesnt drown..........whats that ypou say, they always drown, wow thats impressive then you have a 100% record of catching, convicting and executing terrorists, what brave patriots.

    ReplyDelete
  77. Charlie Cook is saying he starts with the democrats winning 20 seats in the House, and it could get even worse for the repugs from there......losing the House,

    hello Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

    and Barney Frank, chairman of the Financial Services Committee

    and Charlie Rangel chairman of the Ways and Means committee

    and John Conyers chairman of the Judicary committee

    and Henry Waxman chairman of the Government Reform committee

    and David Obey chairman of the Appropriations committee.

    ReplyDelete
  78. Was just reading wiki regarding "Magic Lantern". They reference a program called "Cyber Knight" which sounds even more interesting...LOL

    ReplyDelete
  79. Holy crap. Wiki's got a page on magic lantern?

    Whats this world coming to, lol.

    ReplyDelete
  80. I remember seeing something on TLC or Discovery channel about codes.

    The maker of PGP got in trouble regarding exporting his program because the government couldn't decipher messages so encrypted.

    ReplyDelete
  81. Go check out a movie called The Recruit, with Al Pacino.

    In it, they talk about something called "ICE".

    The concept was real, and there was a company in Northern VA that claimed they could do it, but then we never heard anything more about it, meaning it was probably purchased by the government.

    Basically, if its real, all they need to do is dump a cookie on your system and your data is transmitted in the electomagnetic fields generated around any and all power lines.

    Its an amazing concept, and I believe it could work, and possibly does exist.

    What it means is anyone connected to the national power grid, whether they're connected to the Internet or not, could be easily comprimised.

    No firewall in the world would be able to block it.

    ReplyDelete
  82. I haven't said anything more than the movie said, so I'll leave it there, but the theory is sound.

    Basically, regardless of whether its real or not, when it comes to your PC, the only way to keep the government out is to not connect it to the internet (or a wall outlet if ML is real) or make laws to keep them from doing it.

    Because Microsoft, all the Virus Vendors, the Telcos, the ISP's etc, all have departments dedicated to classified federal government projects, and that means they can put stuff into the OS's, like back doors, or into the applications like Virus Programs, that can comprise your system only for them.

    Also they can filter at the ISP level, and pull everything sent unencrypted off and just see it all.

    Encryption is your best friend.

    ReplyDelete
  83. I gotta question that one.

    On the surface it sounds plausible, but if they were going to listen in on everyone...

    Hell "multiplexing" doesn't even begin to cover it. That many signals at once would look randomized.

    Well, they say intuitive physics is almost always wrong...LOL

    ReplyDelete
  84. "WORFTRON said...
    And even thats not foolproof.

    8:44 PM"

    You beat me to the punch there. All encryption does is slow things down, from what I hear.

    ReplyDelete
  85. The trouble with software vendors such as microsoft is that there is a whole community out there dedicated to finding the weaknesses.

    A backdoor like that would be found by hackers eventually and posted all over the internet.

    ReplyDelete
  86. "WORFTRON said...
    And even thats not foolproof.

    8:44 PM"

    You beat me to the punch there. All encryption does is slow things down, from what I hear.

    ReplyDelete
  87. Hey tex, in the spirit of things maybe you could change your moniker to "TallTexitron"?...lol j/k

    ReplyDelete
  88. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  89. I remember an uproar awhile back regarding either Apple or Intel begining to use chips with unique identifiers...

    That's come and gone, so I suppose they all do by now.

    ReplyDelete
  90. Volt, the thought actually occurred to me! You may be starting a trend.

    ReplyDelete
  91. Voltron said...
    I gotta question that one

    On the surface it sounds plausible, but if they were going to listen in on everyone...

    Hell "multiplexing" doesn't even begin to cover it. That many signals at once would look randomized.

    Well, they say intuitive physics is almost always wrong...LOL


    Well I'm not sure which one your question there, because you're talking about multiple things.

    I am referring to targeted monitoring on systems infected with a worm or trojan of some sort that uses probably some proprietary protocol and rides across the power cable into the wall, and out the national power grid. It would require equipment at the local power substations to make it work, and other stuff, and I'm not even saying its real. I'm just saying the concepts plausible, and there was some evidence it has already been done.

    As for monitoring everyone, they're likely already doing that.

    That would not be hard, it would just take a lot of SANS sites to make it fly. Data passing through digital switches can be "SPAN"d off to a buffer and warehoused for later data mining efforts.

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  92. LOL,

    Well tonight was actually fun for a change. We seem to get along better when we're not talking politics. LOL

    But I gotta work in the morning so I better toddle off to bed.

    ReplyDelete
  93. TT, while I said it is not foolproof, that doesn't mean it just "slows it down" some.

    It slows it down MUCHO.

    Just look at this FBI case with the laptop that they can't get the files because they were encrypted using PGP.

    It is not easy to do, and can take years.

    ReplyDelete
  94. By the way I wrote Lydia and asked her about the account and she said yes, that posts are forwarded to that account, and it just filled up.

    So you didn't send anything, it was just some posts you had made earlier that were bouncing back.

    ReplyDelete
  95. cool.

    And I don't have to worry about impersonators.

    (like anyone could impersonate me...)

    ReplyDelete
  96. BTW, for all TT's complaining about me posting on porn sites (which I don't), I can't help but notice he overlooked a guy who's email is "poonzilla".

    So much for the moral majority, ay?

    ReplyDelete
  97. "WORFTRON said...
    By the way I wrote Lydia and asked her about the account and she said yes, that posts are forwarded to that account, and it just filled up.

    So you didn't send anything, it was just some posts you had made earlier that were bouncing back.

    9:02 PM"

    Worf, that sounds plausible except for one thing. Why would the posts bounce back to Volt's email address. I would think that they would bounce back to eBlogger.

    ReplyDelete
  98. Must be true. I just had an inbox full.

    But you guys would be getting them too though right?

    ReplyDelete
  99. Sorry, I always hang out for a little bit just to see what you say about me when I'm gone...

    LOL

    ReplyDelete
  100. I've had some things bounce from e-blogger before also, those useless fools never respond when i contact them about it either.

    ReplyDelete
  101. TT Said;

    Worf, that sounds plausible except for one thing. Why would the posts bounce back to Volt's email address. I would think that they would bounce back to eBlogger

    Because when you post you are technically posting from your email address. The email address you enter into blogger is where you post is sent from. That is how blogger does it if you have all posts forwarded offline to an email account.

    Some blog owners only read their blog in email, and never actually enter the blog.

    Anyway Lydia said she just checked and its full, and since the SMTP failed delivery receipt says the same thing, then I think thats the most "plausible" conclusion to arise at.

    Unless you have another theory you'd like to share with us.

    ReplyDelete
  102. Voltron said...
    Sorry, I always hang out for a little bit just to see what you say about me when I'm gone...


    Thats why we always wait an extra hour before we rail on you.

    :P

    ReplyDelete
  103. Whoever that guy was that said we dealt with Iraq in "stupidity" and "ignorance" finally got it right. I thought we were about to come into some real honesty in this debate. But...he retracted his statements. Doesnt matter though they have already been broadcast on Al Jazeera.
    I felt better if only for a minute. It scares me that they are just going to deny reality all the way unitl the end. Just keep denying. It doesnt matter what everyone else says I guess they have made no mistakes. The end of what...I dont know. The Iraq Debacle, the elections, the world perhaps.

    Kokomo...big UAW town. The factories span US 31 from the north side to the center of the city. My dads in the UAW. You dont know how much our quality of life improved once my Dad got the union gig at Rolls Royce Engines.

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  104. Lets hope the end of the world thing is a little ways off.

    ReplyDelete
  105. BTW dusty is THIS bet still open?



    I dont want you to have to go on ebay and sell any of your Star Wars
    memorabilia,I do realize how near and dear those Yoda dolls are to you guys.But,lets say we bet $5,000 that the Dems do not win control of either the house or senate or I'd give you 2-1 odds that they dont win both.We could put the money in an escrow account here in Las Vegas and have a lawyer write up the actual bet.What do you say?

    By Anonymous, at 12:46 PM

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  106. Worfeus I wonder if the BIG mouth still stands behind the bet he wanted to make back in February?

    ReplyDelete
  107. Well he modified it, because he knew he lost one house.

    And right now the Senate is too close to call according to everyone, which is a bad sign for the republicans.

    We'll know in less than 3 weeks.

    If the republicans don't win this one, its going to be an interesting next 2 years.

    ReplyDelete
  108. Mike said

    "maybe TT or Johnny is trying to spoof your e-mail to make you the fall guy Dolt."

    A comical, yet calculated effort by Mike to drive a wedge between Voltron and myself.

    I suggest Mikes the hacker........he desperately wants all those sexy pics of Lydia for free.

    ReplyDelete
  109. Talltexitron.....I like it!

    Corny, yet effective.

    ReplyDelete
  110. Worf said, "Anyway Lydia said she just checked and its full, and since the SMTP failed delivery receipt says the same thing, then I think thats the most "plausible" conclusion to arise at.

    Unless you have another theory you'd like to share with us."

    Worf, I'm not trying to pick any kind of fight here, but I would only buy that theory if other people had their posts bounce back to them from Lydia's email address. If Volt is the only one this has happened to, I would say the explanation must lie elsewhere.

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  111. Okay, here's the deal. This happened before with Venusflix: some mail bounced back and said "Delivery failed"

    I switched email accounts so the comments would go to the one Volt mentioned. I guess when the mailbox is too overloaded some mail bounces back, but I've noticed it bounced back to the people who registered an actual email address, not a "noreply"

    Don't know how that works, but maybe it's because Volt used an actual email address or account, which I just saw.

    ReplyDelete
  112. Tiny Intellect said;

    Worf, I'm not trying to pick any kind of fight here, but I would only buy that theory if other people had their posts bounce back to them from Lydia's email address. If Volt is the only one this has happened to, I would say the explanation must lie elsewhere.

    Lydia Cornell said...

    Okay, here's the deal. This happened before with Venusflix: some mail bounced back and said "Delivery failed"

    I switched email accounts so the comments would go to the one Volt mentioned. I guess when the mailbox is too overloaded some mail bounces back, but I've noticed it bounced back to the people who registered an actual email address, not a "noreply"

    Don't know how that works, but maybe it's because Volt used an actual email address or account, which I just saw.
    *****************************************

    Well Tiny Intellect, Lydia just made you out to be a FOOLE once again, because you opened you big mouth about another thing you actually knew NOTHING about, but were quick to impune a sinister action.

    I'd say you LOOK stupid now, but we already KNEW that didn't we TINY?

    ReplyDelete
  113. Clif, what I wrote was a perfectly reasonable scenario, and I posted it BEFORE Lydia's explanation. What's your theory, Einstein? (Cutting and pasting won't help you here.)

    Geeze. A guy posts an innocuous theory and Clif turns it into a personal attack.

    ReplyDelete
  114. Sorry Tiny but I call them as I see they, and you look quite DUMB about now.

    ReplyDelete
  115. Oh look Troll tex is posting his stupid links that no one cares about again...........................................you really must have NOTHING WORTHWHILE TO SAY even more than usual.

    BTW Troll Tex, take off that tinfoil hat son, you sound kinda paranoid.

    ReplyDelete
  116. Mike said, "Oh look Troll tex is posting his stupid links that no one cares about again"

    Would you prefer a full transcript?

    ReplyDelete
  117. I would prefer you crawl back under your rock or bridge or whatever..............but I dont have much to complain about regarding your posts latelt TT, because you dont have much to say anymore...............................cat got your tongue or is it too many lies to keep track of.

    like Clif said a repug is lying when his lips are moving and you've become a lot more honest lately troll tex.

    ReplyDelete
  118. Actually Mike the tiny conscience inTexan has just become MORE Irrevelant lately, and come November 7th he will be even MORE irrevelant.

    His tired and discredited political propaganda is LOSING. And NO amount of bloviating by the drug addicted lying limpman will help it at all.

    ReplyDelete
  119. Saturday, October 21, 2006
    Spitting on vets
    Today's peace movement is being held back by distorted memories of yesterday's peace movement. The documentary Sir, No Sir! reminds us that many, many vets supported Jane Fonda and the anti-war protests. The protestors cared a lot more about the V.A.'s treatment of wounded vets than did the hawks.

    The most pernicious myth, still believed by many, holds that anti-war protestors spat on returning soldiers. If you know of anyone who still believes this nonsense, show 'em this interview with Jerry Lembcke, who teaches Sociology at Holy Cross College. Lembcke examines the origins of this legend in a book called The Spitting Image
    http://cannonfire.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  120. How the Myth of Spat on Vets Holds Back the Anti-War Movement
    Interview with Jerry Lembcke
    Conducted and transcribed by Stephen Philion
    by Stephen Philion


    DIGG THIS

    Q: In the recent days the British general responsible for British troops in Iraq has make remarkably strong calls for British troops to be removed from Iraq. So it’s pretty timely to have a discussion like this, since I’m finding that there are quite a few students who are opposed to the US occupation of Iraq, but are afraid to "go against" the soldiers, many of whom are friends or relatives. First thing, though, is, for the sake of those who haven’t read your book The Spitting Image, maybe you could give a quick intro to the key arguments of the book.

    Lembcke: I got interested in this topic in the runup to the Persian Gulf War in 90–91. There were students who were opposed to the war, but afraid to speak out because of what they had heard about the antiwar movement and veterans during the Vietnam War era. These stories of "spat upon" vets were beginning to circulate in the news and students on campuses were picking up on these stories. I had never heard these stories before. So I got interested in where they were coming from, how long they had been told, who was telling them and so forth.

    One thing led to another and I kept looking back in the historical records, when people were actually coming home from Vietnam and I found out that no, there was no record. Not only was there no record of people spat on, but none of anyone claiming that they were spat on. So then I got interested in the stories as a form of myth and found out that in other times and other places, especially Germany after WWI, soldiers came home and told stories of feeling rejected by people and particularly stories of being spat on.

    Like with the case of the Vietnam stories many of the "spitters" were young girls and knowing that these things happened at another time and place supposedly, I found out about a Freudian psychologist who wrote about male fantasies and treated these stories as fantasies, expressions of the subconscious, men who felt they’d lost manhood in the war. When I told a psychologist friend of mine in women's studies, she asked me who the spitters were…she too thought it was likely a myth since the spitters were women, an expression of loss of manhood.

    Looking a little further, I found that French soldiers returning from Indochina after defeat at Dien Bien Phu also told stories of being treated badly, rejected by women, attacked by women on the streets, having to take their uniforms off before going in public, being ashamed of their military service. These were very similar to stories circulating in the 1980’s in the US. The time gap between the end of the Vietnam War and when the stories began to be told is also a sign that there is something of an element of myth or legend. That’s the key part of the book, not whether or not such things, since it’s hard to refute what isn’t documented, ever happened, as much as the mythical element.

    And of course we see how the rise of the myth had an effect on support for the war in Iraq.

    Q: And what is the link that you see?

    Lembcke: In a nutshell, most people remember there was pretty widespread opposition to the US going into Iraq with huge demos in February and March of 2003. And then there were a good number of "support the troops" rallies that tapped into the popular sentiment that something bad happened to the troops when they returned from Vietnam. The very slogan "support the troops" with the yellow ribbons and all that sort of presumes that someone doesn’t support the troops and that presumption is based on that sentiment, belief that when people came home from Vietnam they were treated badly and we don’t want to do that again this time.

    By having these rallies in 2003, the people who supported the war use support the troops as a way to support the war. A lot of these rallies told stories of Vietnam vets who had been spat on. I got calls from people in Florida, North Carolina, Vermont,…news reporters who had been at these rallies and asking me, "What about these stories?" Sometimes they would even have men who said they were vets or family members who claimed they remembered someone being spat on. The myth was used to drum up emotional support for the troops, or better said, to dampen down opposition to the war. Again, the same way it worked during the Persian Gulf War, some were afraid of being outspoken against the war lest they be accused of being "against the troops."

    I teach at Holy Cross College and just the other day in one of my classes, in the context of talking about the context of the Bush administration’s strategy of being very accusatory toward critics of the war policy as being "cut and run" Democrats, "soft on terrorism..." With no more context than that, one of my students said she was "undecided about the war, but as long as the troops were fighting it was really important to "support the troops and we have to support the mission…" Now is not the time to be critical of the war, it was, in her mind…all mixed together.

    That’s the way it works on people’s emotions. It throws them off-target. The target is the war itself and what we need to be doing is opposing the war itself. Often emotions get kind of confused with this stuff about "supporting the troops." It creates just enough space for the administration to push on ahead.

    Q: Yes, it seems to be a good strategy to distract from the main issue, namely the policy of making war itself. I never quite understand why it’s so important to focus on the supporting the troops as so central an issue. It doesn’t really matter, since the troops in fact have little, in fact no say, in war policies to begin with.

    Lembcke: Yes, it confuses the means and ends of war, it becomes a form of demagoguery. It makes a non-issue an issue, "support or not supporting the troops." At a humanitarian level, none of us wants to put people in harm’s way. The people who oppose the wars are most strident in that objective of keeping people out of the war. That’s not an issue, but it keeps us from focusing on the war itself and talking about it. And one of the things I’m concerned about now is a certain strain of the anti-war movement has gotten caught up in this itself. There’s a certain group of antiwar types who focus on what happens to the soldiers, how they’re damaged psychologically, physically,…I’ve been to a number of anti-war rallies now where all they talk about is PTSD and what happens to "our boys" when we send them off to war. It’s sort of a mirroring of the political right’s approach. They make the "support the troops" ideology the basis for supporting the war, and some strands in the anti-war movement now mimic that we need to oppose the war by "supporting the troops" and, I’ve been to some antiwar protests where very very little is said about the war itself!

    We hear instead about getting the troops the help they need and heart rendering stories of parents of sons who have committed suicide after they come home, etc. That stuff from the anti-war left is as beclouding as similar rhetoric from the right, in that it takes us away from a political discourse, which we need in order to focus our energies around stopping the war and its causes.

    Q: What’s your sense in terms of how this myth is replayed now with vets coming home from Iraq and claims of their being "abused" by the antiwar movement or sentiment?

    Lembcke: I’ve heard a few of these stories. Again, in the spring of ’03, stories circulated about soldiers being spat on. In Vermont a story went around that a woman in the National Guard had been pelted with a box of stones by antiwar teenagers. None of these stories have turned out to be supportable by any sort of evidence. And then, periodically, other stories like one in Seattle of a guy who was back from Iraq marching in a parade, "spat on," "booed," "called baby killer," etc. The same, no serious evidence.

    Occasionally then I get reports of these, but I’ve always suspected if the war goes down as a "lost war," we’ll hear more such stories, but the more important point, I think, is that the image of spat on Vietnam Vets is so engrained and part of the American memory and cultural sub-text, it almost doesn’t have to be reaffirmed through stories of Iraq Vets being "spat on" or "mistreated." It’s almost as though the Vietnam Spitting myth is a background that everyone "knows" about and when the President talks of Democrats not supportive of the war or otherwise baits antiwar people, the background that makes that resonant is the belief that something untoward happened to Vietnam Vets.

    So it’s not necessarily good news for the anti-war movement if we don’t hear stories of Iraq Vets being "spat on." My fear is the mythical spat on Vietnam Vet is now so internalized as something that "happened," it doesn’t have to be spoken anymore as a contemporary phenomenon.

    Q: What’s the significance of the documentary Sir! No Sir, which tells the story of the GI antiwar movement during Vietnam, in terms of what that film can tell students trying to organize antiwar movements on campuses across America today?

    Lembcke: Oh, I think it’s terribly powerful. Even thought there’s no mention of Iraq, Afghanistan, or the War on Terror in the film, it seems that everyone that sees the film can extrapolate from it to the ways it applies to the wars that we’re currently involved in. Probably the greatest impact it has is on young people in the military today. I’ve done quite a bit of public speaking at showings of the film.

    First of all, it reminds even those of us involved in the antiwar movement as vets of stuff that they had forgotten about or informed us about things that were going on at that time that we didn’t know about. They’re kind of surprised to find out quite a few things about the GI antiwar movement that they didn’t know.

    Q: One of the things I was surprised to learn of was the extent of support shown to Jane Fonda by American soldiers stationed in Asia during the war at the "Free The Army" tour that she, other famous actors such as Donald Southerland, and soldiers/vets organized at US bases. Considering all the media discourse about vets’ anger at Fonda, I had no idea that some 60,000 soldiers had attended and enthusiastically received her at those shows, which served as an alternative to Bob Hope’s pro-war tours at the time. Also the extent of African American soldiers in the antiwar movement was something I never fully heard about in histories of the antiwar movement, which the movie makes clear was very deep and militant.

    Lembcke: I was in Vietnam in 1969 and got involved in Vietnam Veterans Against the War once I returned and yet there were things in that film that I had not known about at the time. On the one hand there was a lot in the news in the papers about the vets antiwar movement at the time, which I know now just from researching it. I don’t think there was a blackout at all, often it was front-page news and people knew about it.

    One of the things I found interesting was looking at Stars and Stripes, the civilian-published but military-supported publication that soldiers got in Vietnam and a lot of anti-war news was reported there. It reported the story of Billy Dean Smith, the GI accused of fragging an officer, which is featured in Sir! No Sir!. It had stories about soldiers in Vietnam wearing black armbands in support of the 1969 anti-war Moratorium back home. It turns out Stars and Stripes is a pretty good source for information on the vets’ and soldiers antiwar sentiment and movement back then!

    So people knew of these things then. The more important story is what’s happened to that in people’s consciousness and memory. It certainly is gone now, even from people who were active in the vets' antiwar movement then. Sir! No Sir! has helped to bring it back into the public memory and showing that a vets antiwar movement can happen now is very helpful for people teaching in college and high school. They can take this knowledge into the classroom and that part of the history can get back into the curriculum. Younger people will now get a different view of what happened then.

    I’ve talked to a few soldiers back from Iraq, one a Holy Cross College student who graduated in Spring 2002 who was an ROTC cadet who is back from Iraq and has spoken after showings of Sir No Sir!, and likewise didn’t know about the GI antiwar movement during Vietnam. She reports that there is a lot of opposition to the US occupation of Iraq among US soldiers in Iraq but it doesn’t express itself because there’s no organization, no organized communication between people. Maybe the film will play a catalyst role, if people see this film about organized GI opposition to the Vietnam War, it might inspire and even spark their imagination about the kinds of thing that can be done to oppose the war from within the military.

    Q: And the significance of that for today?

    Well, the GI antiwar movement became a vitally important part of the antiwar movement during Vietnam. And that is likely to be the case today also. Lots of people are asking what’s the difference between today and Vietnam? Why isn’t there a movement today? One possible answer is that the movement within the military is not quite congealed yet, but that the potential is there. Hopefully Sir! No Sir! can have an effect on accelerating that development a bit.

    Q: One of the things that struck me about the film is that you saw that soldiers were not just protesting the war because of their equipment issues or technical matters about how the war was being conducted, but actually because they were against what was happening to the people of Vietnam because of the war and they were learning, while deployed there, about the actual history of the Vietnamese people’s struggles against foreign occupation as opposed to what they were brainwashed to believe in boot camp or high school teachers.

    Lembcke: Here’s a big difference, namely the nature of the "enemy" and how it’s perceived. In the later years of Vietnam we came back rather sympathetic to the cause of the other side. One of the vets interviewed in the film, David Cline, talks of how he was shot and how he had shot a Viet Cong soldier. He then recalls how he looked at the fellow he had shot dead and realizes that this man was fighting for his country too, for freedom. That was a real consciousness raising moment for him and he dedicated moments like that to doing something to honor the loss of that man’s life, namely to end the war and contributing to the other side’s fight for freedom. I certainly came back in February 1970 with such sentiments, though I’m not sure exactly how it happened. Surely conversations with other GIs and my own reading at the time helped with that.

    But today it is harder to portray the "enemy" in Iraq or Afghanistan in that kind of sympathetic way, there’s a political challenge there for the American antiwar movement to understand what the other side represents.

    It needs to get some grasp on what is supportable in what the other side is doing in Iraq and Afghanistan, like we did in the Vietnam War. Recall in the early phases of the Vietnam war, Ho Chi Minh and the Viet Cong were called terrorists and their tactics were called tactics of terror. Today we talk about the roadside bomb in Iraq, but during Vietnam there was the satchel charges were one of the main weapons of the Vietnamese War.

    Q: For those of us who haven’t fought in a war, what is a Satchel Charge?

    Lembcke: A briefcase that would be loaded with explosives, dropped off some place and would explode. The point I’m making is that early in the war in Vietnam the Vietnamese and the Vietcong weren’t as viewed sympathetically as they were by the early 1970’s. What changed was how they were represented in terms of what they were all about. I think we need to go through that rethinking process on Iraq now, though I’m not sure where that goes.

    We don’t right now have an embraceable "other" as we did in Vietnam and what the complexity of the other side means, how it’s to be sorted out, what’s supportable…but we need to find if there is something there to be supportable and that can have a big impact on the military elements against the war, namely that there is an honorableness to the "enemy" on the other side as was the case for GIs against the war in Vietnam.

    Q: I always find it interesting to focus on what happens with US when it does negotiate with the armed opposition in Iraq, what the US’s key demands are during such negotiations and how the US can’t meet the oppositions’ demands because of that oppositions’ demands, no matter how low the bar is set, because those demands go against the interests of the US, given its actual goals in Iraq.

    Lembcke: Most of us understand the war ended when the Vietnamese people won. And when we recognized that the sooner the other side wins, the war is over. The US is not gonna stop fighting until it stops, when the US is unable or unwilling to win the war. That conclusion is very sobering if it’s applied to the war in Iraq. That’s a pretty sobering thought, is this war going to go on until the US can’t do so anymore and at what point is the US antiwar movement going to see that the war won’t end until the other side wins and who is the other side? It’s very complex, the other side is very divided, not a monolith. So I don’t know how that lesson from Vietnam translates into something we can act on to inform our political work today.

    Q: There’s plenty of writing out there on the liberal left that we can’t leave now because of the nature of the opposition.

    Lembcke: Yes, there is that, but you know the pro-war elements during Vietnam used that logic too. They often said we can’t leave now, we’ll have so many losses or the "bloodbath" that would happen if we left too soon…

    Q: I find that when I deal with people on the liberal-left who will argue that calling for leaving Iraq immediately is "isolationism." But if you argue back that this is not isolationism we are arguing, but that the US should pay massive reparations to the people of Iraq for the damage the US invasion and occupation has caused the Iraqi people – no reply forthcoming. They have no answer as to why we know that that is not going to happen if the US stays there or if it leaves!

    But it opens up the question that people on the liberal-left who support staying there that the pro-war or lukewarm "anti-war" liberal left have no answer for, namely what is the purpose of what the US is doing in Iraq? It’s just set in stone for them that if we leave things will be worse, even though the evidence now is so overwhelmingly that the US occupation is the key source of the violence we see in Iraq today. So much so that the argument that once was so common among the liberal left, "well the Iraqis want us to stay" has really collapsed under the weight of Iraqi realities. Now even the Iraqis polled are saying in big majorities in US State Dept. commissioned polls that they want us to leave now and it’s okay to shoot US soldiers.

    Lembcke: The NYT kind of buried that story on the inside, but the antiwar movement can use that information. We shouldn’t have to make that argument, it should be apparent we’re not welcome, but sometimes data helps to persuade.

    Q: It also throws the light back on Iraqis, which the "supports the troops" antiwar movement focus doesn’t do. The focus is so often only on Americans as though the only impact is on Americans or it’s the only one that matters, except for small periods like Abu Ghraib or Haditha…

    Lembcke: Yes, the war becomes all about us and erases Iraqis, much like we did during Vietnam erasing the agency of Vietnamese people.

    Q: Yes, it’s interesting that in the process, ironically, it ignores the agency of the soldiers and their potential role in stopping the war and recognizing the actual roots of war itself.

    Lembcke: Yes, you know one of the best new sources of information for the antiwar movement is another film called "Why We Fight." I saw it with two classes and they haven’t stopped talking about it. If they had heard before about the term "military industrial complex," now it makes it more real. Now they think about the war beyond the slogans of "the war is for freedom, democracy"…which is all most Americans know. The oil thing too has also become a kind of cliché they don’t think about much. For my students those bumper-stickered explanations are erased and the film puts the war in a much more material and realistic framing. It’s a film that might have as important an impact as Sir! No Sir!

    October 16, 2006

    Jerry Lembcke [send him mail] teaches

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  121. Sunday, October 22, 2006
    A BIG Flip-Flop By Another Name
    The facts are that the Bush administration has decided the Iraq war will kill them at the polls and therefore immediate changes are necessary.

    But a Republican regime that is never wrong and is as immutable as the Pope cannot change.

    So the Prez says he isn’t changing strategies in Iraq, he’s changing tactics.

    And the difference is? The Encarta World English Dictionary says: “A tactic is the science of organizing and maneuvering forces in battle to achieve a limited or immediate aim; also called a strategy. A strategy is the science or art of planning and conducting a war or a military campaign; also called a tactic.”

    Nevermind, the psychopath in the White House says, "Our goal is clear and unchanging: Our goal is victory…what is changing are the tactics we use to achieve that goal. Our commanders on the ground are constantly adjusting their approach to stay ahead of the enemy, particularly in Baghdad."

    PARTICULARLY IN BAGHDAD? RIGHT! Baghdad, where the war has totally gone to hell and where the US has been ineffective and useless and where death and destruction is unremitting day and night, and where the enemy has constantly stayed ahead of US forces from Day One up to and including today.

    When the New York Times ran a story yesterday explaining that the Bush administration had drafted a timetable (Yikes! That forbidden word!), White House spokesperson Nicole Guillemard issued a statement that the Times’s account wasn’t accurate, but she didn’t say what was inaccurate.

    On Saturday, the Prez said in his radio address, “We will continue to be flexible, and make every necessary change to prevail in this struggle. Our goal in Iraq is clear and unchanging.”

    That’s about the size of it. The Bush administration is going to change (or seem to change) whatever it needs to change in Iraq so that voters will more wholeheartedly embrace the killing of American soldiers, the devastation, the failure of the Bush administration and the plan for the US to occupy Iraq until the year 3000. But the Bush administration has no intention of changing anything.
    posted by Joy Tomme at 10:08 AM 1 comments links to this post
    http://ratbangdiary.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  122. Which argument is about as cogent and intelligent as President George W. Bush himself was during George Steph’s interview with our National Embarrassment yesterday.

    If Bush weren’t president of the United States, weren’t such a grandiose narcissistic sociopath idiot and asshole, one could almost feel sorry for him. He hasn’t read any of Bob Woodward’s books about him, he said. He wouldn’t feel right reading books about himself, he said. “You don't think there's anything to be learned from these books in real time?” George Steph asked. No! The president answered quickly and succinctly.

    George W. Bush says the Economy is on an upswing, “I've always found the economy to be an issue. And if it's good, you do OK, and if it's not good, you don't do OK in American politics.”

    George W. Bush hasn’t thought about what life will be like if the Dems win. “If I have to, I'll think about it later on. But I'm a person that believes we'll continue to control the House and the Senate.”

    George Steph said that James Baker is looking for a policy between cut-and-run and stay-the-course. George W. Bush said, “We've never been stay the course, George. We have been -- we will complete the mission, we will do our job and help achieve the goal, but we're constantly adjusting the tactics, constantly.”

    And George W. Bush says there is no civil war in Iraq, but the situation in Iraq is “dangerous”.

    With regard to North Korea, George W. Bush said the decision to have nuclear devices is Kim Jong-Il's decision to make. “We've made our decision,” Bush said.

    “Tell us how you made the decision,” George Steph asked the President of the United States. “I don't know,” the President said. “And I — you know, I just don't know. “

    Two more years of that.

    If the Dems don’t prevail on November 7th, then the entire United States truly deserves the consequences.
    posted by Joy Tomme at 10:47

    ReplyDelete
  123. An interesting Associated Press story yesterday said, “North Korean leader Kim Jong Il expressed regret about his country's nuclear test to a Chinese delegation and said Pyongyang would return to international nuclear talks if Washington backs off a campaign to financially isolate the country, a South Korean newspaper reported Friday.”

    Before anyone jumps to the conclusion that the empty threats of George W. Bush were effective, it should be pointed out that China is planning to place an embargo on oil exported to North Korea. Close to 90% of North Korea’s oil comes from China. An oil embargo is far more terrifying to the North Koreans than vague threats from the Bush administration about “grave consequences”. This morning, the New York Times reported that, “China is prepared to step up pressure on North Korea in coming weeks by reducing oil shipments, among other measures, if the country refuses to return to negotiations or conducts more nuclear tests, Chinese government advisers and scholars who have discussed the matter with the leadership say.

    As the NYT says, “experts argue that as long as the Bush administration kept its focus on a diplomatic solution (re North Korea), China would work to maintain solidarity with the United States.”

    But now that the moment has come to step back and let negotiation and diplomacy solve the North Korea problem, what will the belligerent, swaggering, limp-dick, overcompensating Bush administration do?

    ReplyDelete
  124. Hey TT how many times did Bush say "we need to stay the course in iraq" more times than you have fingers and toes i'll guess, even if an inbred like you has 6 fingers and 6 toes. bush also lied about the secret prisons, his claiming he doesnt support torture and spying on all Americans without warrants.............................now we could impeach him for lying OVER and OVER AGAIN, but I say we impeach the chimp for being STUPID and incompetent!!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  125. http://ratbangdiary.blogspot.com/
    Idle Threats
    At least Senator John McCain (R-AZ) was laughing yesterday when he said in Iowa that he’d commit suicide if the Dems gain control of Congress in the November 7th elections.

    But President Bush was absolutely serious when he said the United States would stop North Korea from transferring nuclear weapons to Iran or al-Qaida and that North Korea would then face "a grave consequence."

    The delusional and grandiose Prez would not say exactly how the United States would retaliate. But in an ABC News interview he said, "You know, I'd just say it's a grave consequence. They’d be held to account.” The last time he used the phrase “grave threat”, was with regard to Saddam Hussein.

    "If we get intelligence that they're (North Korea) about to transfer a nuclear weapon, we would stop the transfer, and we would deal with the ships that were taking the - or the airplane that was dealing with taking the material to somebody," the president said.

    "The leader of North Korea has to understand that he'll be held to account. Just like he's being held to account now for having run a test," Bush said.

    So, which is it? Is the Bush administration going to “stop North Korea” and “deal with” ships or planes transferring nuclear materials? Or will Kim Jong-il be held to account “just like he’s being held to account now”?

    Because the way North Korea is being held to account now is by not holding North Korea to account.

    Bush probably believes his vow to ABC News that he would use whatever means necessary to keep North Korea from selling its nuclear arms to other countries, because George W. Bush is crazy as a loon. But even Dick Cheney, who has never served in a war, knows that the US would have to be able to back up an act of war with an army and we barely have enough men in Iraq. Bush just said that “it broke his heart” for American men to die in Iraq but to pull them out would mean defeat.

    A wiser, or at least a sane president, would not make rash claims about staying the course in Iraq plus plans for a new war in North Korea when he can’t get his approval rating above 38%.

    George W. Bush using “whatever means necessary” against North Korea is as unlikely as John McCain committing suicide when the Dems prevail in elections.
    posted by Joy Tomme at 9:59 AM

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  126. In that great pie-in-the-sky deluded world where George W. Bush lives and dreams, at some time in the mysterious and incomprehensible future the US will win in Iraq. And then we all can go to the seashore.

    Another reporter engaged Snow in a back and forth about whether in fact the White House still believes in the principle that when the Iraqis stand up, the US will stand down. After much sophistry and skirting of the issue from Snow, the reporter said, “So they are standing up, but we're not standing down. So is that principle no longer operable?”

    And Snow said, “It seems to me that we're playing -- this is kind of a fun verbal game.”

    That’s the way it seems to me too. The Bush administration is playing verbal games, which it thinks is a lot of fun. And George W. Bush is living in never-never-land, which he thinks is a lot of fun.

    And the real fun for the rest of us is only three weeks away.
    posted by Joy Tomme at 10:21

    ReplyDelete
  127. Middle class living on the edge?
    Could your family absorb the financial strain of a job loss or medical emergency? A Democrat-funded think tank says most families' economic risks are growing.

    By Debora Vrana
    The middle class today is less prepared for an economic emergency, such as losing a job or visiting an emergency room, than at any time since the late 1970s, concludes a new study from a political think tank in Washington, D.C., that's funded by Democrats.

    "Middle Class in Turmoil," produced by the Center for American Progress and the Service Employees International Union, mines data from the Federal Reserve, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, census records and other sources to paint a picture of increasing peril for those in the middle 60% of income distribution, about $18,000 to $88,000.

    Despite a growing economy, a rising stock market and stronger corporate earnings that are helping the rich get richer, the middle class in America is caught in an unprecedented squeeze that makes it increasingly unstable, the study's authors say. The financial declines each year since 2001 have been dramatic, they report:

    Income for middle-class families has remained stagnant or flat since 2001.

    Prices for big-ticket items -- housing, health care, college education and transportation -- have skyrocketed, leaving families unable to save.

    Middle-class families are borrowing record amounts of money to pay their monthly bills.

    "Families are being forced to live beyond their means, just to pay for the basics, such as housing and health care," said Christian Weller, a senior economist for the Center for American Progress, which is headed by John Podesta, a former Clinton-administration chief of staff. "They are not only spending their current income but all their future income."

    Economic risks up sharply
    Researchers frame their conclusions in terms of risk:

    Would you be able to keep your home for even three months if the family breadwinner became unemployed? Just 28.8% of middle-class families could sustain themselves through a spell of joblessness in 2004, the most recent year for data, compared with 39.2% in 2001, the study says.

    Do you have the cash reserves to pay for a medical emergency? With double-digit increases in health-insurance costs for most of this decade, it's no surprise that the number of Americans without insurance rose by 1.3 million last year, up to 46.6 million people, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The cost of family health insurance is up nearly 90% since 2000, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit organization. The study says only 22.3% of middle-class families could cope with the $3,013 average cost of a small medical emergency, such as treatment for a broken ankle. That's down from the nearly 35% that could handle such an expense in 2001.

    Do you have three months of income put away for a rainy day? Just 18.3% of middle-class families -- those with dual incomes earning from $18,500 to $88,030 -- in 2004 had accumulated wealth equal to three months' worth of income, a drop from the nearly 29% who had such savings in 2001. The number is expected to be even lower now.

    "People are incredibly anxious, and families are stressed out. We're seeing too many families passing like ships in the nights in the driveway," said Andy Stern, the head of the Service Employees International Union, the largest and fastest-growing union in the United States. "The rising tide is not raising all boats -- only luxury liners. It's not building the kind of America that any of us want."

    To maintain day-to-day consumption, Americans are taking on record amounts of consumer debt, researchers say -- $5.2 trillion since 2001. In June 2006, families took on debt equivalent to 129% of their disposable incomes, a big increase from the 96% in March 2001. Many homeowners are tapping into the equity in their homes, assuming more debt to pay for escalating energy and health-care costs. Falling home prices could force many of these middle-class families into foreclosure or back into apartments.

    Middle-class families are also struggling with the ballooning costs of higher education. The total cost of tuition, fees, and room and board at four-year public colleges has increased 44% in the past four years.

    A political football
    Expect the financial condition of the middle class to become a critical issue in the November elections, say Democrats, even though Republicans have assailed the new study, arguing the concern is overblown.

    "Let's not kid ourselves. The data say we're wealthy. And we're one of the wealthiest nations on Earth," said Tim Kane, a director at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C. "You can make a case that there is increased inequality, with the rich getting richer, but I don't think there is increased poverty."

    But some economists and others, such as Lou Dobbs, a CNN commentator, are increasingly calling for public-policy action to alleviate financial stresses on the middle class. Dobbs has made the subject a key focus of his on-air commentary, calling the slipping condition of this group nothing less than "class warfare."

    One family feeling the pinch is the Andrew Miller family in Charleston, S.C. With a combined income of just less than $100,000 a year, Miller and his wife say they work harder than ever but are no better off than five years ago. They keep a tight rein on spending, but tiny raises that don't match inflation and escalating health costs are leaving them feeling like they are treading water.

    "The (medical) co-pays have jumped to $25 for each visit," said Miller, who has two daughters, ages 10 and 8. "Luckily, we have pretty healthy kids. But our premiums are also going up. We're just getting squeezed here."

    Middle-class security indicators Year Have 3 months' income set aside Can cover jobless spell Can cover medical emergency
    1989
    21.2%
    35.0%
    Not available

    1992
    16.7%
    25.3%
    Not available

    1995
    24.5%
    36.0%
    32.4%

    1998
    22.6%
    33.1%
    29.2%

    2001
    28.8%
    39.2%
    34.8%

    2004
    18.3%
    28.8%
    22.3%



    Sources: Center for American Progress and Service Employees International Union

    ReplyDelete
  128. Is mommys little poopsie here all by himself?

    ReplyDelete
  129. is that so called female with a big adams apple with you again fool?

    ReplyDelete
  130. Another big day in your social life eh poopsie?Another big weekend with mum and dad.Did you hang out with the "guys?"

    ReplyDelete
  131. TalllTexan said...
    Mike said, "Oh look Troll tex is posting his stupid links that no one cares about again"

    Would you prefer a full transcript?


    No. We thank you for you brevity.

    ReplyDelete
  132. No you repug pedohiles are into hanging out with the 'guys' provided the guys are 16 and under.

    ReplyDelete
  133. Hey TT, what are you going to do when you find out your Idol, Rash Limpballs, is a kiddie perv?

    What are you going to do when it comes out that the only thing he was "visiting" in the DR was the local teenpoon bar?

    ReplyDelete
  134. What are you going to do when you find out he likes to play a game of "Speak into the radio dj's microphone" with 14 year olds?

    ReplyDelete
  135. the repugs seem to have a problem hooking up with women so they turn to underage boys, I mean look at Rove, and Cheney and limpballs and Rusty, they couldnt get any in a whorehouse with a $500 taped to their forehead. the repugs are a far cry from ladies men or toughguys they must be looking in those funhouse mirrors, where what they see is all distorted.

    ReplyDelete
  136. I honestly don't know why he ever let go of that hot Darin Kagin from CNN Mike.

    She could've read my weather report anyday.

    ReplyDelete
  137. Course, she probably was just using his big fat bloated self as a stepping stone to advance her career.

    But she probably got tired of playing "Find the shrimp" so she moved on.

    ReplyDelete
  138. http://www.powers-point.com/

    Monday, October 23, 2006
    THIS IS WHAT WATERBOARDING LOOKS LIKE

    Here is what waterboarding looks like. (Via The Buck Stops Here)

    This is the interrogation technique that has been at the root of the claims that the United States is torturing people at Gitmo. I oppose torture, but I don't consider waterboarding torture (though it is considered such by plenty of smart people...we just disagree). To me torture is amputating limbs or digits, ripping out fingernails, drilling holes in feet, starving people...you know, the things Iraqi insurgents and the Hussein clan do/did to people). That said, I'd be happy to agree that we would never waterboard a soldier who is fighting for a country that has signed on to the Geneva Conventions, since it would be a reciprocal agreement. We have no such agreement with terrorists and the worst of what we do to them -- in an attempt to protect ourselves, not for revenge -- is a walk in the park compared to what they do to Americans they capture or attack.
    We would be unbelievably lucky if they treated us the way we have treated them in Gitmo.

    I don't think the waterboard should be rolled out routinely for any person in our custody. But it should be allowed in extreme cases -- as part of an interrogation, not for fun -- which is exactly how it's been used. Like for people like Khaled Sheikh Mohammed, who admitted to murdering Danny Pearl after about two minutes of waterboarding.

    Allah points out that they probably didn't give KSM breaks, as the person in this video is receiving.

    posted by Kirsten Powers @ 2:11 PM

    ReplyDelete
  139. check out this video on waterboarding and torture.

    http://www.current.tv/video/?id=13462474

    ReplyDelete
  140. NRCC RUNS SLEAZY AD

    When people speak of dirty campaigning, this is what they mean.


    The national GOP campaign office started airing an ad Friday that showed [Democrat Michael] Arcuri leering at the silhouette of a dancing woman who says, ''Hi, sexy. You've reached the live, one-on-one fantasy line.'' He supposedly dialed the service two years ago from a New York City hotel room and billed taxpayers – for all of $1.25 for a one-minute call. He is the district attorney in Oneida County. Now the Utica Observer-Dispatch today notes that Arcuri's campaign has released records to the paper showing the call to the 800 sex line was followed the very next minute by a call to the state Department of Criminal Justice Services – and the last seven digits of the two numbers are the same.

    posted by Kirsten Powers @ 9:07 PM

    ReplyDelete
  141. Those are good articles Mike, but I disagree with the guy on waterboarding.

    I offer to him the same offer I make to anyone else who thinks waterboarding isn't torture.

    Let me waterboard them, and THEN they can tell us wether its torture or not.

    Then they'll be an expert on the subject.

    ReplyDelete
  142. I agree, but the video was interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  143. I think waterboarding is torture and I think thise engaging in torture should be held accountable and all authorizing it does is legitimize it and remove accountability.

    ReplyDelete
  144. I just came across this old post of mine from the beginning of February, we really used to have some good discussions back then.

    "I think we’re back to the Hornet’s nest analogy, I promise I will be relatively brief Kirk, I just
    want to make a point and tie it in with the last few posts. I think NECESSARY is a more
    appropriate choice of words than essential. Essential implies we cant do without it and I think that
    while conflict is at times unavoidable and necessary, it is definately something we can live without
    and thus not essential. Now bear with me here, my point isnt just semantic, while I agree that
    conflict is at times necessary, I think that is only a small portion of the time, much less than people
    actually think. The only times I think conflict is truly unavoidable is when you are in a real “life or
    death” or “us or them” type situation or when greater evil will come from doing nothing. The vast
    majority of the time being open minded and trying to see things from the other sides perspective
    or point of view or showing kindness or compassion can allow things to be resolved without
    conflict or deadly force.

    Now while I think dealing with the REAL terrorists is definately an “us or them” type situation, I
    don’t think the war in Iraq is, we are occupying these people’s homeland against their will, many
    of these people have had friends and family killed and houses destroyed by our bombings, many
    have been accidently shot or blown up by both our troops and by insurgents. I think that the
    majority of Iraqi’s are just poor simple people whose main focus is to survive and get enough to
    eat, not to attack and destroy a group of people they don’t even know on the other side of the
    world, however if we keep giving them reasons to hate us and adding fuel to the fire that could
    change.

    One more distinction, to these people we are invaders and bullies and they are freedom fighters,
    and although there may be some REAL terrorists attempting to enter the country due to the chaos
    we created, the vast majority are not, even though they may use terrorist type tactics much like
    our forefathers did against the British during the Revolutionary War, in their eyes they are
    defending their homeland. I have several friends in the military and have a huge amount of respect
    for our soldiers, however from the Iraqi’s perspective our soldiers are legitimate military targets.
    All this “might makes right” philosophy does is stir up hate and create more enemies, till
    eventually the bully messes with the wrong person, or all of the little people band together to deal
    with the bully. I have to say that I agree with Lydia and Worfeus in that I think the world would
    be a safer place if we didnt invade Iraq, much of the world views us as a bully, mainstream
    moderate muslims are being converted to the terrorist cause, I think if we tried to see things from
    their perspective and put the wheels in motion for a pullout we could turn things around, if not,
    where does it end, its like the Hatfields and the McCoys if one side doesnt blink or attempt to take
    the high road the killing will never stop and both sides will lose, theres no winning a quagmire like
    this, This administration is still caught up in the past fighting the last War, they think its the Cold
    War part 2 ."

    ReplyDelete
  145. BTW dusty the active duty personnel are STARTING to speak out, which means the active duty soldiers have
    LOST faith in the commander in chief and pentagon leadership.

    65 Active Duty Military to Ask Congress to End Iraq War


    This is most unexpected. According to CNN, sixty-five (65) active duty members of the US military (that's right, active duty, not retired) will hold a press conference on Wednesday petitioning Congress to end the Iraq War:

    WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Sixty five active duty service members are officially asking Congress to end the war in Iraq -- the first time active troops have done so since U.S. invasion began in 2003.

    Three of the service members will hold a press conference Wednesday explaining their decision to send "Appeals for Redress" under the Military Whistleblower Protection Act to their members of Congress. Under the act, National Guard and Reservists can send communications about any subject to their member of Congress without punishment.

    These individuals, if they go through with this step, will be acting in the highest interest of their country, because they are risking their careers and possible court martials for taking a public stand in opposition to the Bush adminsitration's policies on Iraq. I know that they assert the right to do so pursuant to the Whistleblower Act, but I doubt that will stop a vengeful administration from exerting every effort to make these soldiers pay for their effrontery. There are no truer patriots, and no braver men and women in the United States today. God bless them all.

    The link to their press release is
    HERE.

    Looks like the MORON in the WHite Housw and the Dunce in the Pentagon have not only lost the faith of a majority of the American people, BUT also those they sent to fight the war. And troops that do NOT believe in their leadership, do not make good photo ops.

    ReplyDelete
  146. What heroes. They risk their necks fighting in an illegal war, because they honor their commitment to their country, and they risk everything else speaking out.

    It takes a lot to speak up, but it takes even more to speak up if you are a soldier. There's hope for mankind yet.

    ReplyDelete
  147. As they SAY, you can not make these quotes up;

    Bush says he uses “the Google.”

    Transcript:

    HOST: I’m curious, have you ever googled anybody? Do you use Google?

    BUSH: Occasionally. One of the things I’ve used on the Google is to pull up maps. It’s very interesting to see — I’ve forgot the name of the program — but you get the satellite, and you can — like, I kinda like to look at the ranch. It remind me of where I wanna be sometimes.



    AAaaawwwwwww georgie's HOMESICK.

    ReplyDelete
  148. Hell the IDIOT should google the word failure...and see what he really is.

    ReplyDelete
  149. Bush is a failure just ask google......LOL

    ReplyDelete
  150. Keith Olbermann, Mr Bush you need to pull over and ask directions.....

    ReplyDelete
  151. Or he could Google FAILURE, #1 response;

    President of the United States - George W. Bush

    ReplyDelete
  152. Google, "worst president ever";

    response;

    President of the United States - George W. Bush

    Obviously google does "know" something, if ti see's bush as both a FAILURE and the worst president ever.

    ReplyDelete
  153. Pat Lang on the fiasco in Iraq;

    Iraq is Partitioning Itself

    "President Bush expressed unwavering confidence in Nouri al-Maliki's ability to clamp down on the sectarian violence. Yet continued instability and rising casualties have led to calls, growing louder as the Nov. 7 elections near, for Bush to overhaul his war plan." Boston Globe

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Nuri al-Maliki is merely one of the actors in the political drama now being played out in Iraq. The "constitution" of Iraq, the election, the purple thumbs, al-Maliki... All of that is just baloney. The real political process lies in the struggle for power and resources that is being waged more or less in the open now among and between the many different and differing insurgent groups (Sunni Arabs) and the Shia factions who are fighting the Sunnis and each other to see which will be the biggest "players" in whatever part of the former Iraqi state the Shia Arabs manage to retain some control in. Ah, which will be the recipients of Iranian favor and largesse and protection? Surely, the Iraqi Shia Arabs have noticed that Iran has opened its purse to the Lebanese "brothers" for re-construction and political purposes.

    I have always (since Desert Storm) been against the partition of Iraq. I remain opposed to that future for the region. 1- Partition inevitably will create havens for anti-American activity in some parts of the country, 2- Partition may lead to a general war in the region among contestants for dominance over resulting parts of what had been a country. 3- The Shia Arab state of "Iraq" will be an ally of Iran.

    Nevertheless, one must face the fact that Iraq is falling to bits, and we have very little power to stop that or affect the division of the "spoils" that is coming.

    President Bush can sit in his "bunker" in the basement of the West Wing and lecture his generals and functionaries until the end of days and that represents NOTHING in the real world of armed political struggle in Mesopotamia. He can lecture Al-Maliki every day and it will affect nothing. Why? It is because al-Maliki is just another Shia contender for power. He is head of the Iraqi government in name only.

    Historians eventually will work this out. By then it will all be long over.

    Pat Lang

    ReplyDelete
  154. clif said...
    Google, "worst president ever";

    ReplyDelete
  155. Does he get a medal for that or something?

    ReplyDelete
  156. Maybe he could be in Ripleys.


    Next to the guy with the 4 foot earlobes.

    ReplyDelete
  157. My take on Pat Lang;

    The Idiot and Dumsfeld produced ineffectual plays, and are doing a kabuki dance for the press while the players on the field have to deal with an offense from the enemy which does not accept our rules, and is playing to WIN, and not just an election.

    And they will do what ever it takes to win, in manpower, not setting some arbitrary level of troops and setting ridiculous goals like purple fingers, which in the game of control mean NOTHIUNG if the purple fingers lead to ineffectual leadership which HIDE inside the green zone.

    And no amount of presidential spokesman disinformation or angry press conferences of the president will change that ONE bit. Sound bites might win elections, they never win wars. So the repugs use sound bites and the enemy uses the tactics which worked against the Soviet Army in Afghanistan.

    Not only has the Idiot and Dumsfeld failed to heed the lessons of Vietnam we were supposed to have learned, they have ignored the lessons the military took away from the soviets defeat in Afghanistan.

    As the repugs thrash and rail against the looming election losses, they have a much bigger problem looming on their horizons. They have failed MUCH worse in their war on terra, in both Iraq and Afghanistan. And that failure and loss will not just cost them an election, but ALL OF US.

    ReplyDelete
  158. The limits of liberty: We're all suspects now

    On new year's day 1990, three days after becoming president of Czechoslovakia, Vaclav Havel looked his people in the eye and spoke to them as no one had done before. It is difficult to read his words without feeling the vibration of history of both the liberation and the horrors of the regime that had just expired, leaving the Czech people blinking in the cold sunlight of that extraordinary winter.

    This is what he said. "The previous regime, armed with its arrogance and intolerant ideology, reduced man to a force of production. It reduced gifted and autonomous people to nuts and bolts of some monstrously huge, noisy, stinking machine whose real meaning was not clear to anyone. It could do no more but slowly and inexorably wear itself out, and all the nuts and bolts too."

    That perfectly defines the true tyranny, where the state takes all liberty and bends each individual will to its own purpose. And here is the interesting thing that Havel put his finger on: no matter how brutal or ruthless the regime, the act of depriving people of their freedom starts the stopwatch on that regime's inevitable demise. What he was saying was that in modern times a state can only thrive in the fullest sense when individuals are accorded maximum freedom.

    I agree. Individual liberty is not just the precondition for civilisation, not just morally right, not just the only way people can reach their full potential, live responsibly and have fun; it is also a necessity for the health of government.


    (snip)

    You might think this story is about the United States, but it is not, the British citizens are being forced to give up their liberty just as the citizens of the USA are.

    And it is frightening what Blair and HIS neo-con group is doing over there MIRROR what Bush and the repug neo-cons are doing here. It's almost like they were playing off the same page in the playbook. To achieve the same goals.

    But that would require some sort of cooperation between the two governments of the British and American peoples to deny them rights which took centuries to build up, and even WW1 and WW2 did not dissolve. And survived the cold war against the thtreat of communist domination by the Soviets.

    Suddenly the term "New World Order" has an onimous meaning.

    ReplyDelete
  159. anyone watching John Stewart tonight, its a good one.

    ReplyDelete
  160. I missed Studio 60 so I'm watching it via NBC webcast.

    Its great. You get to watch the whole show, and only see one commerical per segement.

    ReplyDelete
  161. The drawback is its the same commercial each time.

    ReplyDelete
  162. This next story is a very good indicator of what is happening and HOW bad Iraq has become.

    Sunni captive spared execution by man he saved in battle
    Hala Jaber



    IT was a warm Wednesday morning when Abdul Rahman Ahmad, a Sunni, last risked his life by driving into the Shi’ite Baghdad suburb of Sadr City to stock up on supplies for his thriving supermarket.

    In tranquil, pre-war times, Ahmad, 52, would make the journey to Sadr City’s Jamila wholesalers’ market every week, lingering to savour its spicy fragrance and its cacophony of banter and barter. But since the militias on either side of Baghdad’s post-war sectarian divide had started picking out victims at random, he paid no more than one peremptory visit a month.

    Ahmad always sought safety in numbers. On this particular morning, he arrived with 28 fellow traders in a convoy of 11 vehicles.

    The grim fate of frightened groups of men going about their business in Baghdad has become a routine story in the Iraqi media but Ahmad’s account of the horrors that befell his friends is remarkable, not least because he alone lived to tell the tale.

    They had been in the market for only half an hour when it suddenly started to empty. Shutters were rolled down and doors locked. By the time Ahmad’s group tried to leave, all the exits were blocked by white four-wheel-drive vehicles surrounded by men in black from the Mahdi Army of Moqtadr al-Sadr, the radical Shi’ite cleric. The men checked identity cards, sending away three traders with Shi’ite names but marching the 26 Sunnis towards their vehicles. They ignored the pleas of their captives who were blindfolded with hands tied behind their backs.

    “They drove us off in broad daylight and in front of everyone and nobody could help us,” Ahmad said.

    After half an hour, the vehicles stopped in the playground of what appeared to be a school where the blindfolds and bonds were removed.

    “We were hit on the head and our families and religion were cursed as they lined us up,” Ahmad recalled. “We were surrounded by 30 armed men all dressed in black.”

    It was at this point that a sheikh arrived to declare: “A death sentence has been issued against you.” His announcement created panic.

    “We were all begging and screaming and shouting,” Ahmad said. “We were so terrified that the mood was totally hysterical. Some men beat their chests and hit their faces and their bodies as they pleaded. We screamed to be spared. We even knelt on the ground and begged them not to kill us. But I saw death in their eyes.”

    During these excruciating minutes, Ahmad felt the gaze of one of the militiamen upon him. The man approached and spoke softly to him amid the pandemonium. “You are Abdul Rahman?” he asked. “I am Karim. Does my name mean anything to you?” Ahmad realised instantly that the two men had been in another desperate situation 15 years earlier when they were soldiers retreating on foot from Kuwait beneath a ferocious American bombardment at the end of the first Gulf war.

    “You were injured in the leg and I carried you on my shoulders,” Ahmad said. And he began to cry.

    Karim glanced at the other traders, who included Rahman’s 21-year-old nephew. “I can’t do anything for them but I will try to save you,” he said. “I will be your executioner but I won’t shoot you. As we open fire you must immediately drop to the ground and play dead.”

    They were made to march for about five minutes and then to stand in a line. “I thought to myself, ‘this is it’,” Ahmad said.

    At the sound of the first shot he hit the ground as he had been told to do and two men fell on top of him. The firing continued for perhaps two minutes. He was picked up and dumped in the back of a truck and eventually thrown on a piece of waste ground with the others.

    As soon as he reached home after the massacre on August 16, Ahmad and his wife began preparing to flee with their four children to Amman, the Jordanian capital, where he recounted his ordeal last week.

    Ahmad’s friends were among 2,200 people who died violently in Baghdad in August. The figure for September rose to nearly 2,600 and October’s figure is expected to top 3,000. It is little wonder, then, that 1.6m refugees are estimated to have left Iraq, 500,000 of them for Jordan. “What is important is that I am alive and with my family,” Ahmad said. “I never ever want to go back to Iraq.”

    ******************************************

    We have NO real clue what they go through every day.

    But Bush would like to "stay the course" , I wonder if the Iraq's agree with him?

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  163. I just picked up the book "HUBRIS" by Michael Isikof and am skimming through it, listen to this exchange betweem Helen Thomas, Ari Fleischer and GWB. at the beginning on page 2.


    Bush casually asked Fleisher how his day had ben going and what the talk in the pressroom was. fleisher mentioned Helen Thomas and that she was a Gadfly constantly giving him a tough time on Iraq.

    Bush and other Administration officials had been decrying saddam as a threat to the USA and the world. To many it sounded like war talk. the media were filled with speculation that the White House was preparing for invasion, But Bush refused to state his intentions.

    At the days press briefing Thomas had peppered Fleisher with questions about Iraq, refering to stories in the media about secret plans for military action, what was the presidents rationale for invading Iraq, what made saddam differnt from other dictators and worth an invasion.

    Fleisher said "Bush believes the people of iraq as well as the region will be MORE PEACEFUL and better off without Saddam, Helen Thomas retorted " thats not a reason to go to war" Fleisher responded "Well Helen, if you were president you could have vetoed the law"

    As Fleisher recounted the exchance for Bush, bush's mood chasnged and out of nowhere, he unleashed a string of expletives.

    Bush said ""did you tell her I dont like motherfu#$%s who gas their own people"

    "did you tell her I dont like assho$%s who lie to the world"

    "did you tell her i'm going to kick his sorry motherfu$%ing a$$ all over the middle east"

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  164. I love these quotes in particular:

    Fleisher said "Bush believes the people of iraq as well as the region will be MORE PEACEFUL and better off without Saddam"

    here's another gem by GWB "did you tell her I dont like assho$%s who lie to the world"

    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA, Bush must have alot of self hatred and loathing with all the times he has lied to the world and the American public.

    ReplyDelete
  165. Aww. Bushy doesn't like himself.

    ReplyDelete
  166. Independent Voters Favor Democrats by 2 to 1 in Poll
    Iraq War Cited Most Often As Top Issue for Elections



    By Dan Balz and Jon Cohen
    Washington Post Staff Writers
    Tuesday, October 24, 2006; Page A01

    Two weeks before the midterm elections, Republicans are losing the battle for independent voters, who now strongly favor Democrats on Iraq and other major issues facing the country and overwhelmingly prefer to see them take over the House in November, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.

    ReplyDelete
  167. speaking of voting, I called the state elections board or whatever its called because I didnt receive my voting card and I mailed it in 2 months ago, their reply was that it was mailed to me over a month ago, could be simple incompetence, but it looks a little odd to me that people registering 2-3 months prior to an election would not get a voter registration card, almost like they know people who are not registered yet would vote against the incumbants.

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  168. Worfeus the repugs are the party of FEAR,

    They ran campaigns based on it,

    the forsed silence from the opposition with it,

    and NOW they shake with it, because they see reality is coming back, and reality is like FDR,

    "We only have to fear is fear itself"

    and the Americans seem to be deciding the FDR approach to war works better then the GWB approach,



    NO FEAR

    ReplyDelete
  169. The only thing we have to fear is their fear.

    When republicans are afeared the rest of us suffer.

    ReplyDelete
  170. Some of them are starting to realize that fear of getting killed by a terrorist is pretty silly, considering you have a better chance of being killed in a subway mugging than you do from a terrorist.

    ReplyDelete
  171. And thats if you live in Arizona.

    ReplyDelete
  172. or a long time I've had a post rattling around in my head about fear. I've had no luck writing the thing. But this great post by Alex, about a Cato Institute paper called "A False Sense of Insecurity" (PDF), finally spurred me to make the attempt. Bear with me.


    What harms people in the U.S.?

    Mainly heart disease and cancer, along with several other health ailments, accidents (mostly automobile), and suicide.

    Homicide used to be among the top 15 killers, but it dropped off that list in 2003. Military attack on home soil hasn't happened since WWII. And terrorism? From the Cato paper:


    Until 2001, far fewer Americans were killed in any grouping of years by all forms of international terrorism than were killed by lightning, and almost none of those terrorist deaths occurred within the United States itself. Even with the September 11 attacks included in the count, the number of Americans killed by international terrorism since the late 1960s (which is when the State Department began counting) is about the same as the number of Americans killed over the same period by lightning, accident-causing deer, or severe allergic reaction to peanuts.
    There's more to threat assessment than body count, but ... peanuts?

    It seems the main threat to the Americans comes not from other people but from ourselves: smoking, eating poorly, getting no exercise, polluting our air and water, and driving around in 2-ton personal vehicles.

    And yet. What do we spend money on? Defending ourselves against other people. Almost half the U.S. federal budget is devoted to military expenditures. (Of course, the lion's share of DoD money is not "defending" us from anything. But put that aside.) Bush's military budget request for 2007 is over $460 billion. That's about 46 times the total U.N. budget, seven times larger than the military spending of China (the next biggest spender), and bigger than the military spending of the next 14 nations combined.

    The Iraq war may yet run us over $1 trillion.

    We Americans spend a grossly disproportionate amount on threats from other people rather than the things that, objectively speaking, most endanger our health and well-being. But harm is harm; death is death. I don't see why those who suffer and die from diseases of civilization are any less to be lamented than those killed by terrorists.

    Americans also spend a grossly disproportionate amount of time thinking about threats from other people. Parents live in terror of "stranger danger" and child abduction, while stuffing their children with fatty, salty food, allowing them to sit in front of video games for eight hours a day, exposing them to environmental toxins, and driving them around in cars that mangle and kill thousands of them every year.

    Fear of crime has risen in tandem with punitive criminal sentences for years, even though violent crime has declined for over a decade.

    It sometimes seems that the healthier, wealthier, and safer we get, the more we fear other people. Why?

    The biochemical system homo sapiens uses for threat assessment evolved over many thousands of years of brutal animal life on the savanna, at a time when living to 30 qualified you as a senior citizen. Immediate danger to person or tribe elicits a torrent of hormones from our adrenal glands; we are gripped by a fight-or-flight response.

    As a way of avoiding danger on the savanna, it's handy. As a way of assessing the dangers of 21st century human society -- the worst of which are slow, imperceptible, and accumulative -- it sucks. Really sucks.

    The toxic American political milieu thrives on this maladaptation. That as much as anything explains why contemporary environmentalism is difficult (dead, whatever). More on that next post.

    ReplyDelete
  173. so over the last 40 years about the same number of Americans have died from eating peanuts or getting hit by lighntning as have died from terrorism........but the Neo Cons expect us to sacrifice our freedoms and dismantle the constitution for a threat that over a 40 year span is about as dire as eating peanuts.

    ReplyDelete
  174. George W. Bush was in the Air Force?

    We saw the importance of air power six days ago -- six decades ago, after our nation was attacked at Pearl Harbor. Soon after the attack, General Hap Arnold called Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle into his office and gave him an unprecedented mission -- retaliate against Tokyo. Just over four months later, Doolittle's raiders had shocked the world by striking the enemy capital some 4,000 miles away from Pearl Harbor. To do it, they had to load B-52 bombers on the deck of an aircraft carrier, sail within a few hundred miles of enemy territory, take off and drop their payloads, knowing they had little chance to make it safely to China.

    I'll bet any Navy vets can see that Georgie had to be really coked up.......really to think what he said could ever happen.

    Even the White House website has a FOOTNOTE for those who do not know what the problem is.

    ReplyDelete
  175. Thats some good writing Mike. I am having a hard time seperating your writing from the article.

    Thats why I use italics when I'm quoting.

    ReplyDelete
  176. oops I forgot quotes and a link, I have to figure out how to do the italics and links.

    ReplyDelete
  177. Italics is easy. Just put an i inside of two angled brackets.

    I can't type it here because the blog will interpret the characters and not display them, but just put in a < and I and an >.

    Then close the tag when you want the italics to stop with an < and an / and an i and an >.

    Thats it.

    A link is not much more completected.

    ReplyDelete
  178. testing testing

    ReplyDelete
  179. http://gristmill.grist.org/story/2006/8/15/0351/50738

    By Dave Roberts
    "or a long time I've had a post rattling around in my head about fear. I've had no luck writing the thing. But this great post by Alex, about a Cato Institute paper called "A False Sense of Insecurity" (PDF), finally spurred me to make the attempt. Bear with me.


    What harms people in the U.S.?

    Mainly heart disease and cancer, along with several other health ailments, accidents (mostly automobile), and suicide.

    Homicide used to be among the top 15 killers, but it dropped off that list in 2003. Military attack on home soil hasn't happened since WWII. And terrorism? From the Cato paper:


    Until 2001, far fewer Americans were killed in any grouping of years by all forms of international terrorism than were killed by lightning, and almost none of those terrorist deaths occurred within the United States itself. Even with the September 11 attacks included in the count, the number of Americans killed by international terrorism since the late 1960s (which is when the State Department began counting) is about the same as the number of Americans killed over the same period by lightning, accident-causing deer, or severe allergic reaction to peanuts.
    There's more to threat assessment than body count, but ... peanuts?

    It seems the main threat to the Americans comes not from other people but from ourselves: smoking, eating poorly, getting no exercise, polluting our air and water, and driving around in 2-ton personal vehicles.

    And yet. What do we spend money on? Defending ourselves against other people. Almost half the U.S. federal budget is devoted to military expenditures. (Of course, the lion's share of DoD money is not "defending" us from anything. But put that aside.) Bush's military budget request for 2007 is over $460 billion. That's about 46 times the total U.N. budget, seven times larger than the military spending of China (the next biggest spender), and bigger than the military spending of the next 14 nations combined.

    The Iraq war may yet run us over $1 trillion.

    We Americans spend a grossly disproportionate amount on threats from other people rather than the things that, objectively speaking, most endanger our health and well-being. But harm is harm; death is death. I don't see why those who suffer and die from diseases of civilization are any less to be lamented than those killed by terrorists.

    Americans also spend a grossly disproportionate amount of time thinking about threats from other people. Parents live in terror of "stranger danger" and child abduction, while stuffing their children with fatty, salty food, allowing them to sit in front of video games for eight hours a day, exposing them to environmental toxins, and driving them around in cars that mangle and kill thousands of them every year.

    Fear of crime has risen in tandem with punitive criminal sentences for years, even though violent crime has declined for over a decade.

    It sometimes seems that the healthier, wealthier, and safer we get, the more we fear other people. Why?

    The biochemical system homo sapiens uses for threat assessment evolved over many thousands of years of brutal animal life on the savanna, at a time when living to 30 qualified you as a senior citizen. Immediate danger to person or tribe elicits a torrent of hormones from our adrenal glands; we are gripped by a fight-or-flight response.

    As a way of avoiding danger on the savanna, it's handy. As a way of assessing the dangers of 21st century human society -- the worst of which are slow, imperceptible, and accumulative -- it sucks. Really sucks.

    The toxic American political milieu thrives on this maladaptation. That as much as anything explains why contemporary environmentalism is difficult (dead, whatever). More on that next post."

    so over the last 40 years about the same number of Americans have died from eating peanuts or getting hit by lighntning as have died from terrorism........but the Neo Cons expect us to sacrifice our freedoms and dismantle the constitution for a threat that over a 40 year span is about as dire as eating peanuts.

    ReplyDelete
  180. cool, now I gotta figure out the bold like Dolt does and remember how to do links.

    ReplyDelete
  181. The problems with Georgie's speech to dedicate the, United States Air Force Memorial Dedication in Arlington, Virginia.

    1. The Raid that Bush referenced too place on, April 18, 1942.

    2. The B-52's first flight took place on, April 15, 1952.

    3.a. The aircraft carrier the raid took off from is the USS Hornet.

    b. Lenght, 824 feet 9 inches

    c. Width, 114 feet


    4.a. The B-52 has a wingspan of, 185 ft 0 in

    b. and a lenght of, 159 ft 4 in


    c. and take off requirement of 8200 ft.

    Seems the air craft carrier that doolottle used was a bit short for a plane that was not even built when the raid occured.

    But Bush being WRONG about the facts is NOYTHING new is it.

    it is just disrespectful to the memories of those who fought the WW2 raid NOT to check the facts, and disrespectful to the Air Foprce that Bush knows so little and his handlers allow him to LOOK SO STUPID

    ReplyDelete
  182. Only some Coked up foole would think a B-52 could ever take off the USS Hornet.

    ReplyDelete
  183. Mike Bold just requires a ..b.., in place of the I for italic letter, B is Bold letter

    ReplyDelete
  184. This is a great peice Mike, and is a point I have been a strong advocate of in here and in TP (before they banned me permanently).

    I really want to meet the American who is scared of terrorist attacks, because I want to ask them a question.

    I want to ask them how they deal with the volumes of other ways the are about a million times more likely to die from.

    If they're so afraid of something thats about as likely to happen as monkeys flying out of their butts, how do they deal with the real likelihood of automobile accidents? Do they just not drive?

    How do they deal with heart disease? Are they all vegitarians?

    How do they deal with crime? Do they just not leave their homes? Or for that matter, are their homes steel fortresses?

    I'm serious, I'd really like to talk to the American who is so afraid of the terrorists they'd hand over our constitutional freedoms to the President hoping it will keep them safe.

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  185. testing testing

    ReplyDelete
  186. CLIF!

    Thats HILARIOUS!

    When did Bush give this speech?

    I wonder if the press will pick up on it? How could they put him up their with all thost false facts?

    Are they just so used to lying that they don't even think about it anymore?

    ReplyDelete
  187. If you want to do links you need to do whats called an anchor tag.

    Just like the italics or bold tags you use the brackets.

    You need to do a bracket < followed by an A followed by a space followed by the word HREF followed by an immediate = sign followed by a single " followed by the URL followed by another " and a closing bracket>. Then your text goes here. Then just close it with a bracket followed by a slash / followed by an A followed by a closing bracket >.

    Thats it.

    ReplyDelete