Monday, February 20, 2006

NO CONSPIRACY THEORY: DIEBOLD ELECTRONIC VOTING CORRUPT * UAE DEAL

We all have built into us the capacities for kindness and creativity and beauty. It's a matter of perspective. As Einstein said, "The single most important decision any of us will ever make is whether or not to believe that the universe is friendly." It's your choice. (If you're sick of all the bad news, read Wayne Dyer's amazing words below these articles.)

Think about this: UAE is a state-owned company. What happens when things change in the state -- when leadership changes or a coup takes over? Obviously this whole thing is coming down because Bush & Co. has been doing family business with these people for many years. UAE must own Bush or Bush owes these guys, and he cannot guarantee our safety unless he gives in. They must really want this deal! I wonder why. What's strange is that now I think everything is staged. Farenheit 911 was RIGHT! Michael Moore should be redeemed by all the doubters. 911 happened on Bush's watch for a reason. Think about it.

Something to think about: The backlash in Bush's own party against Bush for the UAE port deal may pay off big in the elections next year; it gives these Republican congressmen a way to look good to their constituents. Wouldn't that be weird if this was the sole reason for the "sale talk"? Just kidding, I'm not a conspiracy theorist, but it almost seems too outrageous of an idea to be believed. Here's what's strange: we are handing over control of our ports to a Muslim regime. The very reason Osama Bin Laden came after us in 9/11 was that we were in bed with the Saudis for capitalistic reasons, which OBL thinks is sacrilege: a direct affront to Muslim holy scripture, at least OBL's version. If his duty is to kill all non-Muslims and those who collude with non-Muslims, what's to stop him from blowing up the UAE itself or planting people within the organization? Even if Dubai has all the safeguards, doesn't this very fact cause Al Qaeda to be more motivated to attack us again -- through our own ports? I mean, talk about bringing the enemy over to our house!! On the other hand, maybe UAE would protect its investment and hire extra forces and advanced technology to protect the ports. WHAT DO YOU THINK? He have to feel that we are living in a world that still makes sense and have hope; otherwise we are going to defeat ourselves.
* For those who don't know, I am talking about Bush selling control of our major ports to the United Arab Emirates, Dubai)

** EVERYONE: You have to read MARK CRISPIN MILLER'S AMAZING BOOK: FOOLED AGAIN: How the Right Stole the 2004 Election and How They'll Steal the Next One Too.

3. NOT A CONSPIRACY THEORY: REPUBLICANS PLANNED FOR YEARS TO TAKE OVER VOTING MACHINES BY DIEBOLD; NEVER AGAIN WILL WE HAVE PAPER BALLOTS. DIEBOLD HAS BEEN HACKED INTO.

BRADBLOG has uncovered DELIBERATE HACKING by REPUBLICAN-OWNED DIEBOLD VOTING MACHINES. Read all about it at
http://www.bradblog.com/Diebold.htm

Interview with Wayne Dyer continued:

FC: But it's a pretty violent, messy planet, isn't it?

Dyer: It is. But for every act of violence and messiness there are a million acts of kindness and goodness. It just depends where you look. And when I look around at virtually anyone or anything on the planet, I can see another face of intention - beauty.

FC: In an effort to practice kindness, you recommend viewing every human encounter as a "holy relationship," the ability to celebrate and honor others, no matter who. But what about when you encounter people who are irritating, rude or even destructive?

Dyer: Generally, I try to stop myself from getting frustrated. I'm not a hundred percent successful, but I'm a thousand times better than I used to be. Anyone who's angry, nasty or rude is really offering a plea to be loved. I play a game with myself, trying to convert them from what I call low-energy emotions that drain us - frustration, irritation, anger and impatience - into high-energy emotions that sustain us - love, caring, kindness.

FC: How do you do it?

Dyer: By asking that surly waiter or harried airline clerk something about themselves or by expressing empathy, "Where are you from? It must be tough standing on your feet for eight hours." Anything to let a person know that, in that moment, I'm thinking more about them than about myself. And you know what happens? Instantly you see a smile.

FC: So paired with kindness would be another face of intention, what you call receptivity. No one and no thing is rejected?

Dyer: Exactly. Whenever you have a thought that excludes or judges anyone else, you aren't defining them. You're defining yourself as someone who needs to judge others.

FC: But don't we all judge one another?

Dyer: Yes, we do. But doing that less is one of those things we want to practice. Anytime I judge another harshly, I always find myself feeling worse.

FC: So when you're feeling offended by others...

Dyer: Remember this rule: Stop taking yourself so seriously! Get your ego out of the way and connect back to kindness - that from which you came.

FC: In your book, you write that controlling ego is intention's enemy.

Dyer: Ego is the part of us that believes: I am what I have, I am what I do. I am what others think of me. All this is just an illusion. The problem? If you are what you do, then who are you when you don't do it any longer? If you are what you have - then when you no longer have it, you no longer have any value!

The truth is that we are all spiritual beings. And when you see yourself as a piece of God, then you see yourself as connected to everything and everyone. In the recovery movement, they call what I'm talking about letting go and letting God. (If you're uncomfortable with the word God, just add an o and make it Good. The two words are interchangeable.) It just means allowing this divine source of kindness, beauty and creativity to be the dominant force in your life - whatever you're doing. I truly believe that God writes all the books and builds all the bridges. Sure, I sit down for six or seven hours a day with my pen and pads - but the message moves though me and I just allow.

FC: And when we're able to align ourselves with the power of intention, how will our lives change?

Dyer: I think you'll experience calmness where there used to be anxiety. You'll leave others feeling energized, so people will want to be around you. You'll start seeing miracles showing up - the right person, unanticipated abundance. You'll feel like you're collaborating with the universe instead of it working against you.

FC: Finally, you write that, "Your job is not to say how - it's to say yes!" What do you mean?

Dyer: I mean that the answer to how is yes! When you say yes to life, you attract divine guidance. When you're inspired, you're collaborating with fate. Everything starts working for you.

***********************

Revote in Ohio After More Votes Than Voters Recorded on Diebold Touch-Screen Voting Machines!
Court Orders Special Re-Vote Tomorrow After 'Failure' of Montgomery County, OH's New AccuVote TSX Machines!
County one of forty-four to implement new touch-screen machines for last November's election resulting in inexplicable results...

********************
US Church Alliance: Washington is 'Raining Down Terror' with Iraq War, Other Policies: Statement from representatives of the 34 U.S. members of World Council of Churches
by Brian Murphy

PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil - A coalition of American churches sharply denounced the U.S.-led war in Iraq on Saturday, accusing Washington of "raining down terror" and apologizing to other countries for "the violence, degradation and poverty our nation has sown." We lament with special anguish the war in Iraq, launched in deception and violating global norms of justice and human rights. We mourn all who have died or been injured in this war. We acknowledge with shame abuses carried out in our name. "Hurricane Katrina revealed to the world those left behind in our own nation by the rupture of our social contract," said the statement. The churches said they had "grown heavy with guilt" for not doing enough to speak out against the Iraq war and other issues. The statement asked forgiveness for a world that's "grown weary from the violence, degradation and poverty our nation has sown."

The World Council of Churches includes more than 350 mainstream Protestant, Anglican and Orthodox churches; the Roman Catholic Church is not a member. The U.S. groups in the WCC include the Episcopal Church, the Presbyterian Church (USA), the United Methodist Church, several Orthodox churches and Baptist denominations, among others.

Our country responded (to the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks) by seeking to reclaim a privileged and secure place in the world, raining down terror on the truly vulnerable among our global neighbours . . . entering into imperial projects that seek to dominate and control for the sake of national interests," said the statement. "Nations have been demonized and God has been enlisted in national agendas that are nothing short of idolatrous."

"The message also accused U.S. officials of ignoring warnings about climate change and treating the world's "finite resources as if they are private possessions." It went on to criticize U.S. domestic policies for refusing to confront racism and poverty.

© Copyright 2006 Associated Press

MORE ON DIEBOLD

As reported in yesterday's Middletown Journal, a special "re-vote" will be held tomorrow in Montgomery county, OH on an issue where last November's election results were set aside due to more votes being cast on Diebold's AccuVote TSX touch-screen voting machines than there were actually registered voters who voted!

MARYLAND: In a Letter to Election Board, Guv of Diebold's Model State Declares He 'No Longer Has Confidence in Their Ability to Conduct Fair and Accurate Elections. Maryland's Republican Governor Issues Devastating Blow to Diebold!
Calls for Paper Ballots, Decries Lack of Security, 1000% Increase in Maintenance Cost for Diebold Voting System!

A brutal condemnation of the MD Elections Administrator, Linda Lamone, charging that her work and that of her staff, has been "primarily on behalf of partisan legislators and their interests and not on the interests of the citizens of Maryland." Maryland was the "model state" for Diebold. It was amongst the first to roll out a near state-wide adoption of the new paperless Diebold DRE (touch-screen) voting machines after the 2000 election.

In the letter sent by Maryland's Republican governor Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr. to the State Board of Elections on Wednesday, he declares that he "no longer [has] confidence in the State Board of Elections’ ability to conduct fair and accurate elections in 2006."

Citing the "widespread national concern about the reliability and security of electronic voting systems," the decertification and denial of certification of Diebold around the country, and the need to "get aggressive in responding to citizens' concerns over public confidence in the elections system," Ehrlich says it's time to demand paper ballots once again in the State of Maryland.

Ehrlich in a letter to BoE Chairman, Gilles Burger, "the voters of Maryland should be allowed to vote a paper ballot or have a voter verification paper-trail to electronic voting as reassurance to voters that their votes are being accurately cast."

In his excoriating letter to Burger, the Governor goes on to cite the 78% increase in base cost for the system over original estimates and the -- sit down for this -- "1000% increase for estimates of the annual maintenance costs for this system."

** WE ARE THE ONLY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD WITH NO PAPER BALLOTS AND NO PAPER TRAIL. DIEBOLD IS A DISHONEST SHAM.
*******************************************************

332 comments:

  1. Freedon Fan said "Worf certainly anyone can change almost anything...if they want to. As debilitating as their religion is, Muslims could still probably change eventually if the west had an abundance of this strength to offer. This has been my hope for some time, but lately I've become discouraged by the cacophony of division I hear and the inherent weakness it represents. How can we convince our enemy to change if we are divided ourselves?"


    Freedom Fan I agree with you that we need to try to foster change in a positive type of way, but I dont think saying change or we will kill you is a way to bring about that change, all that will do is cause them to hate us and unite against us.

    while installing democracy in iraq my sound all noble and flowery on paper it is the wrong direction to go. as i said in a previous post that I will repost in this blog, the war on terrorism and the war in Iraq are two completely seperate and distinct things, and abandoning the war on terror to invade iraq and install democracy is a mistake. In my mind this is akin to going on an expensive around the world vacation when you cant make the mortgage payment.

    our deficit is ballooning and our country is on the verge of bankruptcy, I feel our priorities should be making our country safer and fighting terrorism, not installing democracy in Iraq. we should use our limited resources to secure our borders and ports and to help root out terrorism.

    When I say root out terrorism I think we should be spending money on developing intelligence to infiltrate these terror cells and destroy them from with in via covert operations, although that does not rule out military action as well if neccessary. additionally we should be supporting and working with moderate countries that desire change but are afraid of the fundamentalists starting a coup and seizing power, i remember hearing that Saudi Arabia wanted to become more moderate but many of the leaders were afraid of fundamentalists overthrowing them if they embraced western values or support America, we need to cultivate trust and help foster change in a positive way rather than saying become what we want you to become or we will kill you. change only comes through wanting to change, you cant force someone to change.

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  2. I have one question, if we were to distill Bush's prime objective or at least what he claims to be his prime objective down to a single phrase or sound bite, I think it would be keeping our citizens and country safe.

    Now here's my question, if the prime objective is to keep our citizen's and country safe domestically, then wouldnt it make much more more sense to take our 200,000 or so troops and utilize them to secure our borders and ports and too seek out and destroy real terrorists like Osama and Al Queda rather than making them targets in a civil war/insurgency in a foreign land that had absolutely nothing to do with the real terrorists that attacked us.

    while it may sound all benevolent and flowery to want to liberate another country from an oppressive dictator and install democracy, if protecting our own citizens like Bush claims is the primary objective shouldnt we worry about protecting our own citizens first rather that helping foreigners. Our ports are still not secure, neither are our borders, and the emergency response for hurricaine Katrina was pitiful, shouldnt we work om helping our own citizens before we worry about a foreign country.

    Now having said that, I dont believe for a minute our primary objective is just to liberatre Iraq and install democracy, I think thats a side benefit and the fair cloak the men of power use to justify the war, I think the real reasons were to defend the petro dollar as Clif said, as well as to build up their oil infrastructure and get their production capacity cranking to break the pricing power of OPEC, aditionally there are all the lucrative contracts rebuilding Iraq as well as many reasons we may never know.

    One thing I do know is that despite what the Bush Administration says the War on Terror and the War In Iraq are two completely distinct things and it annoys me to no end that our government abandoned the War on Terror to go wage war in Iraq, every day this goes on our safety is compromised domestically, both because our resources are being used for questionable purposes instead of what they are being claimed to be used for or what they should be used for, and also because we are stirring up more hatred of us and helping these terrorist recruit.

    I am tired of hearing our government spew lies that we are making our country safer by being in Iraq, or that there is a link between Iraq and the terrorists, or that these people hate us because of our freedom, if that is the case then maybe Bush is trying to appease them by taking away our freedoms and civil rights all as he claims to "keep us safe"

    Having a company from the UAE guard our ports is another highly dubious decision by this administration akin to having the fox guard the chicken coup, if the terrorist come from the middle east dont you think putting a middle eastern country in charge of guarding our ports is questionable at best, I remember in the past most foreign telecom mergers were turned down because of national security, now they are allowing a foreign company to secure our ports, I find this disturbing, however if it is allowed I feel our leaders who are in charge of national security should be held to a higher standard than most people, for instance if a this results in a terrorist attack directly related to their misconduct, negliigence or incompetent then I believe they should be facing hard jail time, and if there was misconduct were they knowingly compromised our countrys safety for personal gain, then I feel that is TREASON, and they should either get life in prison or swing from the gibet like many traitors did in the past.

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  3. And FF, I feel there is a big differnce between unconditional love and blind loyalty, while I may love my country unconditionally, I am not blindly loyal to its leaders who are there to serve us, if they are taking us down a path i feel will lead to disaster I am not going to just jump on the train and close my eyes and hope the wreck isnt too bad, no, i'm going to try and get them to change course and avert the train wreck.

    same goes for your analogy of family, while I may love my family unconditionally, it does not mean I will blindly support any heinous thing they may do, trust and loyalty must be earned, blind trust is a dangerous thing. I agree with what you said that we should take responsibility for our own success and failures, but that doesnt mean if our children, government, friends, etc.. are heading in a bad direction we shouldnt let them know that what they are doing is wrong and give them support and direction to change.

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  4. George9:08 AM

    Mike

    Do you really think that abandoning the International scene will help the west in the long run. This was tried in the 30's and resulted in the rise of Hitler and such dictatorships. Indeed the withdrawl by western nations over the past few dozens years from these now invaded areas of the world has resulted in terror groups growing there.

    A forgien policy has to be more long term and comprehensive than a plan by any single winner in the internal power struggles of the US. That nation, the US has taken the lead, want it or not in defining the west to the rest of the world.

    That definition has to be clear and long term without regard to self absorbsion or economic might. Hard to run the world by fairplay it is..

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  5. Mike, I will respond to you on the previous thread. I don't want to hijack Ms. Cornell's topic this early in the game.

    I haven't studied this vote rigging controversy, but it would appear to be just another bogus left-wing conspiracy, like the Republicans will bring back the draft, Dubya planned the WTC attack, evil corporations are oppressing the masses, etc.

    Otherwise it would be front page news in the NY Times, seeBS, CNN, and other leftist propaganda factories. If Elephants-Stole-The-Election-Gate could be proved it would be bigger than Watergate or Monica-Gate. Brad has been beating this horse for a while, but I'm pretty sure it has assumed room temperature.

    Here's a couple of questions that if someone can answer credibly, I will become interested in this topic:

    Weren't the Democrats represented in the process to ensure that the voting machines were accurate? Who were the Democrats responsible for ensuring accuracy? If they failed to detect that the system was flawed, shouldn't those Democrats be the center of this controversy? Please tell me their names (you do know who they are don't you?).

    In the first election, the Democrats sued over hanging chads in Florida, the vote was subsequently counted and recounted ad nauseum and the results were always the same: Dubya won--MoveOn.

    So they bring in electronic voting machines in the second election and Dubya wins by an even greater margin. Naturally the Democrats blame the voting machines.

    Democrats just can't accept the fact that the majority of voters reject their ideas; most folks don't want socialism and third trimester abortion.

    In order to be elected, Liberals must pretend to be Conservative, and after deceitful Bill Clinton parsed the word "is", folks just aren't buying that shtick anymore. I doubt Peoria will buy that Hillary is really a Conservative either, but we shall see.

    Voting machine rigging is simply Democrat wishful thinking--a tempest in a teapot. Deal.

    BYW I'm pretty sure I saw BigFoot in my backyard last night.

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  6. FF, even if no impropriety did occur just as in the case of port security, shouldnt we err on the side of caution, if there is a flaw in the voting machines that could allow people to hack in and alter elections what is so wrong with going back to paper ballots and putting this controversy to rest for future elections.

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  7. George, I am not advocating isolationism like in the 30s or a withdraw from the international scene, what i'm saying is that we should use our limited resources to make our country safer and fight terrorism, not nation building and installing democracy in other countries, if you read my previous post i said we should be building up our intelligence and fighting terrorism through covert operations, we should try to destroy them from within, we should also be trying to win the trust of moderate regimes who actually want to change but are afraid of being overthrown by radical fundamentalists, we need to support and protect these regimes and show we have a commitment to help them change and can be trusted. we cant force other countries to accept democracy or our way of life if they dont want to, but we should be supporting those who do and who are opposed to terrorism as we are.

    think how the invasion of Iraq looks to the rest of the world, how come we didnt invade a poor African country with no valuable resources to overthrow their dictator and install democracy.??/

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  8. George10:05 AM

    The ballot box issue in some way is a technology issue. A method of secure digital signatures attached to each ballot without permitting the compromise of the information contained with respect to any side has to be fully devised. The technology is still evolving and must be kept under close scrutiny in order that no impropriaties are taken by any group.

    Technology will move forward; hopfully lowering the cost of democratic government but verifiable safeguards must be implaced to facilitate a just result.

    Mike I agree in part with what you say.
    but Invade a poor country like Grenada ? the US did that too, but today maybe Grenada is better off. The point is that the peoples of these nations will have an exposure to a diffrent form of government that may lead them to aller that which is propelling them to committ the acts they are doing.

    The advent of oil money has propelled the peoples of these lands unto the world scene ,ye they do not as yet have a full knowldge of or understanding of the last 500 years of changes in the west. Sadly military intervention has been used to push forward the convergence of ideas and ideology.

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  9. FF, even if no impropriety did occur just as in the case of port security, shouldnt we err on the side of caution, if there is a flaw in the voting machines that could allow people to hack in and alter elections what is so wrong with going back to paper ballots and putting this controversy to rest for future elections.
    -Mike

    Fraud is far easier with paper; paper is more difficult to manage and easier to forge. In the 21st century, the foundation of the financial world is entirely electronic--it is more efficient and more secure. I just bought a $3,000 hi-def plasma TV over the internet. I also use an ATM for cash, have a microwave oven, a fax machine, and a computer, but no typewriter, no buggy, no buggy whip. Paper is for Luddites. Aren't Democrats supposed to be "progressive"?

    Perhaps Brad or Ms. Cornell could provide a single example of an actual uncounted or duplicate vote which occurred as a result of electronic voting machine fraud. Using unsupported anecdotes from whining politicians who lose elections is hardly credible.

    Besides doesn't everyone get a receipt when they vote? I always do. The receipt has a control number which can be traced into the system--presto--an audit trail. This is ancient technology.

    No this whole rigged election thang is a major yawn.

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  10. FF said;

    Fraud is far easier with paper; paper is more difficult to manage and easier to forge.

    Once more you demonstrate your lack of technical knowledge in a given area FF.

    This is what I do.

    In fact, I used to work for the government in network security, and I still work in that area, albeit for myself.

    You apparenlty have no idea how EASY it would be to drop in worm to change every other democratic vote to republican, or vice versa.

    In fact, it could easily be done, and be virtually untraceable.

    This is one more area where your lack of knowledge is apparent, and your judgement is thereby flawed.

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  11. Or perhaps you think it would be simpler to change 400,000 paper ballots by hand as opposed to what could be done in less than one second?

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  12. FF : I agree with your assertion on the voting issue, AND I do have one question....... If my bank can use technology to find every stinking penny and every dollar and make sure we are all balanced properly, then why can't we use that same technology to make sure we don't lose THOUSANDS of votes?

    As to our muslim friends..... There won't be a true Muslim democracy until there is a Muslim THomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, VOltaire (the real one) etc. We can't cram enlightenment down these guys throats can we?
    Doesn't it seem that this kind of change or paradigm shift needs to come from within? We aren't going to be able to force a Pax Americana on these people unless we are willing to treat them like we did the american indians.... And I hope that we have evolved enough to see the unacceptability of this option.

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  13. then why can't we use that same technology to make sure we don't lose THOUSANDS of votes?


    First we are not loosing thousands of votes. They are right there. They are just being changed from Democrat to Republican.

    Second, its that very same technology that is facilitating this capability.

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  14. What we need is Bi-Partisan real time monitoring of the process. We also need bi-partisan and real time code analysis and data access to reduce the risk of tampering.

    We also need cheap Dot Matix printers set up at any electronic polling centers which print a paper copy of the ballot in case we need a to do a recount.

    Any IT department would have designed this type of solution.

    Any that is, except for our secret and clandestine new republican government.

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  15. Anyone who believes these votes can't EASILY be manipulated with our current system, knows nothing about computer technology.

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  16. You apparenlty have no idea how EASY it would be to drop in worm to change every other democratic vote to republican, or vice versa. In fact, it could easily be done, and be virtually untraceable. This is one more area where your lack of knowledge is apparent, and your judgement is thereby flawed.
    -Worf

    Very troublesome indeed. Well that's the last time I ever use an ATM! Please notify the New York Times about this outrage immediately.

    Perhaps to demonstrate, you could hack this blog and make Ms. Cornell appear to be a Republican--that would be hilarious. While you're at it can you hack my bank to provide an extra couple grand? I'm getting kinda short on cash.

    Maybe you could also show me the studies using random statistical tests where the control numbers on voters receipts were traced into the system and shown to be fraudulent or missing.

    It is unfortunate indeed that the Democrat party did not consult with someone who commands your vast knowledge before agreeing to install these new-fangled electronic thang-a-ma-jigs which are so dog-gone easy to hack. I say we stick with hanging chads.

    BTW if the Democrats win in the next election, can we safely assume that this dastardly breach of security has been properly addressed?

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  17. Kirk said "We can't cram enlightenment down these guys throats can we?
    Doesn't it seem that this kind of change or paradigm shift needs to come from within? We aren't going to be able to force a Pax Americana on these people unless we are willing to treat them like we did the american indians.... And I hope that we have evolved enough to see the unacceptability of this option. "

    kirk i agree, these people have to want to change, the only way to force them to change and win despite what the right wingers say is genocide like we did to the american indians, like clif said there is no way to successfully defeat an insurgency short of genocide, and if the Neo Cons are being truthful when they say they are not for genocide, then I think they need to seriously reevaluate their game plan.

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  18. FF, ATMs and voting machines are two completely different things two completely different things, just like the War on Terrorism and the War in iraq are two completely seperate things. your comparing apples and oranges.

    BTW, Worf never once mentioned ATM's, nice try though :D

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  19. FF -- please google "Diebold Hack Test" or check Brad Blog for detailed reports on how they failed the hack test.

    By the way, I also read your essay and admire your idealogical consistency. But in general, from reading your other writings, it seems you have a utopian idea of your party - it all sounds good on paper. And you are committed to "group-think" and labeling all liberals as one way, all conservatives another way. Your idea of "liberal" is alien to me.

    Tell me, what is your background and what kind of childhood did you have? Was there divorce or any tragedy in your family? Believe it or not, we all have an agenda based on our wounds. And don't tell me it's too feeling-oriented or "traitorous or mushy" to want to know the psychological makeup of others -- it EXPLAINS MOTIVATION. And with knowledge of "the other" solutions can be reached. Shouldn't we embrace our differences rather than exploit them --and take the best from each other so we can heal the rift in America right now?

    My theory is Math vs. Art: Artists are liberals, economists are conservatives -- but we need both.

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  20. Perhaps to demonstrate, you could hack this blog and make Ms. Cornell appear to be a Republican--that would be hilarious. While you're at it can you hack my bank to provide an extra couple grand? I'm getting kinda short on cash.


    I am not sure what your levity here is desinged to convey. Are you mocking my profession, or questioning my role in it, or just being generally silly?

    Either way I could care less, you once again opened your mouth on a subject you know nothing about, and you just happened to be unlucky enough to pick someone who happens to be an expert in the field for which you are inaccurately expounding on.

    You are wrong. These machines, and your bank account are a lot more vulnerable than sheep like you will ever know.

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  21. Anonymous12:38 PM

    Oh boy, here come the grassy knoll people again.They just cant admit that the majority of americans could care less what they think.

    ReplyDelete
  22. They just cant admit that the majority of americans could care less what they think.

    Kinda like how you just can't admit that we could care less what you think.

    Oh thats right.

    You don't think.

    You follow.

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  23. They just cant admit that the majority of americans could care less what they think

    You mean like we could care less what you think?

    Oh thats right.

    You don't think.

    You follow.

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  24. FF, i find it curious that you are always so vehemently against proposed solutions to eliminate posssible corruption or inpropriety and are always so quick to dismiss solutions or scandals that do not fit your postition, logic and belief system. when the debate starts you quickly start assigning preconceived labels views and beliefs to your opponents without even taking the time to look at what they really have to say. you wouldnt know me if you bumped into me on the street and yet you CLAIM to know my all beliefs and views on a wide variety of topics despite multiple post of mine that are in direct conflict to what you CLAIN I believe in, As lydia said you exhibit groupthink and are blindly loyal to the Bush administration.

    I also find it curious that you choose to twist what people say, turn the debate to semantics and when someone else makes a point that counters your argument or logic, you frequently start with the insults or spewing what you feel this person's beliefs are and what you feel ALL liberals stand for. debate is one thing but I think you are here to dance around the real debate by spewing sterotypes and partisan rhetoric.

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  25. George12:57 PM

    I love this line:

    Quote:
    If my bank can use technology to find every stinking penny and every dollar

    Then by corollary
    Why not put the IRS incharge of vote counting ?

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  26. in other words, I think your here to deceive people and throw a wrench in true debate.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Or FF you could google Alaska and Diebold and see that they are suing to get info from Diebold to see if the machines in alaska were hacked in the last elections.

    As an aside both Diebold and ESS are in the hands of two brothers who are big time GOP contributors and both fight vigoruosly to keep any of the operating info from state election officials who are checking the acuracy of the state and federal elections in their states.

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  28. Also another comment about how proper repugs run elections, the election that selected the current majotrity party leader in the house of representatives had MORE BALLETS THAN MEMBERS on the first ballot and these guys are ALL REPUBLICANS, and supposed to be honest enough to represent the people of their districts. When they control the canidates and all the ballots THEY CAN'T EVEN GET THAT STRAIGHT. They will even cheat on each other.

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  29. Like Worf said it couldnt be that hard to design a secure system with fail safes and checks and balances like a paper trail etc..

    I just dont understand how anyone would be against undertaking countermeasures to insure the integrity and honesty of the process unless they had some sort of vested interest, or the corruption claim has merit.

    The repugs are always against checks and balances and improvement and insuring integrity and if they are truly on the level i cant understand why?

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  30. Ms. Cornell, thank you for reading my essay, The World Is At War. Will We Survive? I respect you as a worthy opponent as well. I first admired you when you admitted to an error over at BradBlog. I had never seen a Liberal do that.

    I came to your site when you "invited" me by quoting me in one of your posts. I also admire your willingness to listen to opposing points of view; you are not afraid of the truth. This makes your blog very interesting; echo chambers are painfully boring.

    Having said that, don't expect me to cut you any slack. Bwahahaha.

    Similarly I don't recognize the racist, ignorant, Christian-right, war-monger, heartless, nazi chimera of a Republican which Liberals invent in attempting to shout down Conservative ideas. I consider myself to be just a typical Republican on just about every issue. If you really want to understand how Republicans think, and not just parrot some gratuitous Democrat talking point, I’m the real deal.

    No doubt you are doing research for your book, but I'll be your Huckleberry. In answer to your inquiry, I came from a loving intact family and I love my folks. Growing up in the Vietnam era, my entire family on both sides was Democrat; however, I didn't think much about Republican v. Democrat politics until grad school. The Vietnam War ended when I was a senior in ROTC in college, so I served in the Reserves in peacetime. I don’t remember your sitcom, but I’m sure it was very good.

    I never bought into the America-hatred and hippie crap that my two older sisters did. One joined a disgustingly filthy commune took LSD, smoked pot, free love...the whole scene. She died recently as a young woman with ovarian cancer and I often wonder what role that lifestyle played in her demise. My older sisters did not get along with my parents.

    A life changing moment came when as a Freshman in college, I was making good grades, but miserable and blaming my personal problems on my parents and others who had actually sacrificed and done so much for me. I eventually became ashamed of my lack of gratitude and figured that this was not a healthy habit so I decided to stop. It wasn't an easy habit to break, so I started keeping a diary of my objectives and beliefs. I would refer to this whenever I started back into the blame game.

    My mantra became "individual responsibility" because I discovered the hard way what an empowering and life affirming attitude this is. It wasn't until graduate school that a room-mate and I discussed politics and religion well into the night and I realized that this concept of individual responsibility and embrace of the free enterprise system represented the fundamental difference between Republicans and Democrats. I have been a life-long Republican ever since, as has my wife of 35 years and her entire family. A recurring theme with me is the importance of freedom in our lives, hence my nick.

    As a military brat, I grew up in many places but spent much time in the south. As a kid, I witnessed racism first hand and was appalled by the “Men-Women-Colored” restrooms and drinking fountains; I remember my little black friend and the shopkeeper who threw us out of his hardware store, the schoolyard bullies who called me a n*ger-lover. I also was deeply disturbed upon learning the horror of the Holocaust by watching the Eichmann trial on TV. So Democrats can call me a bigot all they want; it doesn’t faze me because I know in my heart what real racism is and I despise it with every fiber of my being. If you want to see some genuine racism and you have a strong stomach, you can visit this repulsive holocaust-denying blog: Cytations (Try to figure out what team these maggots are on. Hint: It’s not mine.)

    My blog personality is fairly different from how I am in person. I am fairly shy and rarely discuss politics or religion with anyone I don't know intimately and dislike offending anyone. So blogging is my outlet to express my inner thoughts...to remove the mask which everyone must wear to get along with family and work associates. I enjoy using poignant insults, satire, and humor of every sort which I might refrain from using in polite company. I love debating and relish a challenging fight (I usually win at least in my own mind). I realize that sweeping generalizations are necessarily false because not everyone in a particular group is always anything. Regardless I use this technique to force my opponents to either defend or denounce the outrageous actions of members of their group who share their values. I always try to understand my opponents and their motivations and values. As you can probably tell I put a lot of time into making my posts interesting and accurate, because I believe this is part of a permanent record which is probably more important than most of us realize; these words can be read by anyone in the world for a very long time.

    In my work with computers, I am an application developer; a problem-solver who takes enormously complex problems and solves them with an elegantly simple solution. So I approach many things in life the same way. I have little patience for nuance and feeling-driven behavior. I believe in truth as an absolute; two people may have different perceptions of it, but they can’t both be right. I will try to reduce an argument from the obscure blizzard of facts to its essence, because when someone understands that a certain belief is not consistent with his core values, he will eventually reject it.

    BTW, I don’t disagree in general with your math-v-art comparison of Conservative-v-Liberal thinking, but how do you explain the phenomenon that many analytical folks have an aptitude for music? Could it be that some folks can use both sides of their brains?

    In real life, I am the peacemaker who reconciles feuding folks. I despise gossip, lies and hypocrisy. If you can prove that something I said was false, I will admit it. I hate true intolerance which I would define as disliking someone for who they are, over which they have no control. But I don't pull punches when I am opposed to what someone does or says or believes. I won’t be intimidated when someone pointlessly calls me naughty names. I routinely defend weaker folks from stronger folks; I don't tolerate bullies. I also brush my teeth regularly and wear clean underwear (usually).

    If you enjoyed my last essay, here are a couple others of which I am particularly proud. It's only fair, since I plan to read your book very closely!

    Conservative v. Liberal World Views

    Fascism

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  31. Freedom Fan, i'm curious as to what type of conservative you would categorize yourself as, in the past republicans were always known as the fiscally conservative party and since Bush 43, i think this has changed, i just cant see the fiscally conservative republicans being all that happy with Bush's policies and wondered were you would fall on that continum?

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  32. ...the election that selected the current majotrity party leader in the house of representatives had MORE BALLETS THAN MEMBERS on the first ballots...
    -Clif

    debate is one thing but I think you are here to dance around the real debate
    -Mike

    Mike, it would appear that it is Clif who is the expert on dancing here...

    /sorry, I suppose that proves your point or something, but it was just too good to pass up

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  33. Freedom Fan, i actually agree with most of what you say in your current essay, it is pretty well written, there are a few things i dont quite agree on and/or would like to here your opinion on, i'll post my comments later tonight.

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  34. This is an outrage! I for one will not be fooled again by ballet fraud!

    (As if any more proof was needed. Or any proof at all for that matter.)

    ReplyDelete
  35. FF,

    Your 2:24 post was reasonable and balanced. Also I appreciate the candor in describing your life.

    It does help when you know the person you are debating is not a 26 year old college student with an axe to grind.

    I have always been frank in my posts as well with regards to my life.

    I do have a question. You said you work with computers and you are an application developer.

    That title these days has been streched beyond its meaning, so I am curious. Do you work with a language, or do you work at the business development level or CMI type level?

    If you do work with a language, I am curious to know which ones, i.e C++, JAVA or Java Script, ASP, PERL, VB, GNU C,etc.

    And if you do work with a language, please explain why you it would be so difficult to set a worm, logic bomb, etc into the core OS, or even down low into a BIOS or into a proprietary ROM Chip?

    If you do program, then you would know this is not just doable, but unbelievably simple to do, and can be made virtually impossible to trace.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Anonymous3:56 PM

    Wow,its now the battle of the pocket protector boys.

    ReplyDelete
  37. FF Said

    I remember my little black friend and the shopkeeper who threw us out of his hardware store, the schoolyard bullies who called me a n*ger-lover.

    See, when you open up instead of condemning me as a traitor, I actually find things to like about you.

    Like that.

    We shared similar experiences, except I grew up outside of SE DC, so I was the minority. My dad was a working man, never drank (except occasionally in the summer he would have a 'glass' of beer. He actually pored salt into his half glass of national bohemiam to take the head down, LOL), and worked every day of his life when I was a boy.

    We were not apartment people. Our family always insisted on owning a house, so when I was 5, they bought our first house, just outside of SE DC. It was a semi-rough neighborhood, but we had a large fenced in yard, about half an acre, so we were in our own little world.

    And it was a good world.

    Our family was not opposed to giving charity, but they were hell bent against recieving it.

    I remember once I came home from school with a form from my 3rd grade teacher. It was for free school lunches.

    See apparently my dads meager salary was at or below the poverty level, so I qualified for the school lunch program.

    I didn't know better, I just thought, "hey, if they want to give me a hot lunch for free, who am I to complain. It beats cold peanut butter or baloney every day."

    My mother took the form out of my hand, read it, smacked me hard across the face and instructed me to walk to the waste basket, tear it up and toss it in, and to never bring another peice of crap like that into her house again.

    Needless to say I got the point.

    When I was 17 I was on my own with only a 7th grade education, no money and no specific skills other than a strong back. I worked hard, starting out in Moving and Storage, and worked my way up to becoming a carpenters helper, although I was never very good at it, at least not like my pa.

    I made my own way in this world ever since. I have never been on unemployment, never accepted a food stamp or other welfare program, or anything else of the sort.

    I would say individual responsiblity has been a cornerstone of my life.

    Why tell you this?

    Because I consider these to be conservative values, and republican values, and values that I think you share.

    I am appalled at the number of Dems on welfare, having abortions, etc. It sickens me that Dems want to make butchering their own unborn children the number one talking point in most of their campaigns.

    Everytime they win it's like yay, now we get to kill our unborn, hooray.

    Being adopted it deeply troubles me. No one should have an abortion unless its absolutely necessary (I know I know, you wish my bio mom would have aborted me, right?), and then only in the most dire of circumstances.

    Adoption IS the plain, simple answer to abortion. Solomon like even.

    But they don't want to see it.

    Anyway I do understand, and share what I believe are core conservative principles with many of you, perhaps more than you know.

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  38. And thats why I am not a Democrat.

    I don't want some group telling me how to vote, and what issues I should be concerned about.

    I am perfectly capable of making up my own mind.

    When I'm not, I'll ask Big K to shoot me.

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  39. GOP Governors Question Port Turnover

    AP - 14 minutes ago
    WASHINGTON -

    Two Republican governors on Monday questioned a Bush administration decision allowing an Arab-owned company to operate six major U. S. ports, saying they may try to cancel lease arrangements at ports in their states.

    New York Gov. George Pataki and Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich voiced doubts about the acquisition of a British company that has been running the U.S. ports by Dubai Ports World, a state-owned business in the United Arab Emirates.

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  40. Gee Lydia, maybe you were right about that prayer thingy.

    Cause I know I was praying that this thing would not go through, at least not down here in my neck of the woods.

    And if I was praying, freakin everybody around here must have been too. LOL.

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  41. Worfeus,

    Thanks. I am a business application developer who uses VBA, MS Office products, SQL Server and links to enterprise data residing primarily in Oracle and similar databases. I have done similar work for about 25 years. However, I am not a computer scientist and certainly no expert on the lowest levels of chip design, nor assembly, nor C, etc.

    You're correct that putting a worm in a piece of software probably would be easy to do...if there were no built in safeguards. If you are claiming that it is impossible to design and monitor a voting system for security, then we must disagree.

    I am also a political realist who understands that there are news reporters, bloggers, and politicans who go to work every day trying to dig up dirt on their political opponents. Most are paid a lot of money to do this. Sometimes they find something, but usually it's bogus tripe comprised of fear-mongering and conspiracy theories. Why aren't these folks interested in your story? Don't you think they would come to your door, follow you around, pay you lots of bread, or at least treat you to a decadent dinner if there was a story here? Brad has been running with this fairy tale for quite a while and no one seems to be interested. Why?

    There is little doubt in my mind that the Democrats as well as Republicans had someone with your security expertise examining every crevice of the voting machine project. Before I start believing yet another bogus conspiracy theory, isn't it fair for you to supply the name of the high-ranking Democrat who was responsible for monitoring this project? Wouldn't this represent an example of massive incompetence on his part? Shouldn't he be fired?

    Also as an erstwhile computer auditor, I know someone doesn't have to know anything about a computer to analyze its internal controls and perform statistical tests to determine if it is providing accurate results. Didn't this project have an independent auditor? Who was it? Shouldn't they be sued?

    Furthermore, if either party attempted such a thing, wouldn't this be so serious as to assure the demise of the entire party? This would be far bigger than Watergate. That party would have its credibility so undermined that it would never dare to field another candidate. It would assure that the party was permanently dead.

    Plus wouldn't it look kinda fishy that one party was always winning elections? Call me clairvoyant, but I have this suspicion that y'all will lose all interest in this story once a Democrat gets into office. You probably will not even remember this story, lest you feel a twinge of embarrassment for running with it without an iota proof.

    Using common sense does not require a masters in computer science. If someone makes an accusation, it's not up to me to disprove it; the burden is on the accuser to prove it. So far ya got bupkis.

    I'm also not much interested in hearing about how Dubya planned the WTC attack so he could be re-elected, or how the Republicans will bring back the draft, or how the energy industry is conspiring every time the price of gas goes up, or learning the whereabouts of the Lock Ness monster, etc.

    ReplyDelete
  42. FF If you are claiming that it is impossible to design and monitor a voting system for security, then we must disagree.


    No, I'm not saying that. I just said they haven't done that yet.

    ReplyDelete
  43. FF Said

    I am also a political realist who understands that there are news reporters, bloggers, and politicans who go to work every day trying to dig up dirt on their political opponents.

    Agreed. In fact, half the right wing is either on trial or being investigated for these and similar tactics.

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  44. Why aren't these folks interested in your story? Don't you think they would come to your door, follow you around, pay you lots of bread, or at least treat you to a decadent dinner if there was a story here

    First they would have to know who I was, and second they would have to know that such tactics out here in the boonies will land them face down on a gurney while a nurse pulls rocksalt out of their ass.

    :D

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  45. FF Said;

    There is little doubt in my mind that the Democrats as well as Republicans had someone with your security expertise examining every crevice of the voting machine project.

    God I hope not.

    They need someone smarter than me.

    ReplyDelete
  46. ...Anyway I do understand, and share what I believe are core conservative principles with many of you, perhaps more than you know.

    Thanks for that Worfeus. Conservative principles just seem like natural laws to me. They just make sense. Whose world view is inherently more credible, one with consistent principles or one based on ever-changing emotion and short-run band-aid solutions to social problems? I think most people will become conservative if they drop the emotional baggage, guilt, whatever, and think it through.

    Mike I believe asked me about the Republicans running up the deficit. Yeah, I'm appalled at that but the Democrats are still screaming that it still isn't enough (and never will be). So they have zero credibility on fiscal issues as well; they just have different spending priorities. It will take another third party candidate like Ross Perot to ever focus attention on this subject again.

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  47. Lydia wrote: "My theory is Math vs. Art: Artists are liberals, economists are conservatives -- but we need both."

    Well that explains it...... I majored in math, and I can't draw worth a damn. But I'm liberal in many areas......and conservative in others. I'm not moderate.... I'M SCHIZOPHRENIC....... is there a 12 step group for that? Yes, but I'm the only three there.

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  48. Kirk12

    It's okay to be paranoid...if they're really out to get ya.

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  49. I didn't say I was paranoid. When I hear the voices they usually tell me to get milk from the store or brush my teeth.

    Seriously FF..... I'm gonna go read those 2 blogs you mentioned, see ya later bro.

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  50. FF : having read your blog about Fascism....... I can certainly see how you would be offended by anyone characterizing you as Fascist. Personally I think it's just something libs say to sound really cool....... kind of like how cool it is for cons to call libs communists. Both instances are, in my opinion, based on an unwillingness to see the other point of view...... "If you have an opinion different than mine there must be something wrong with you, since my opinion is based on facts and is well thought out. Therefore you must be a Nazi, Fascist, Commie, etc."

    So I don't see it helping either way.... the comments of the Unitarian minister @ how you are a fascist (ridiculous notion) or your responses to those assertions as well.

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  51. FF

    You're welcome, but I didn't say I was a conservative at heart, I said I share many so called conservative values.

    Where I come from, those are just values, not conservative are liberal, just values.

    But I am strongly opposed to the apathetic mass slaughter of a defenseless nations just because some Americans are afraid that some day sometime they might hurt us.

    Its not courageous by any strech, and it certainly is not American.

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  52. As to Con v lib world views.....

    THere's a lot of stuff there but I do want to address the abortion issue........ I think you are exactly right.....

    "We need to respect the Constitution by amending it to include a provision addressing abortion. But before we do this must be willing to discuss it and reach a national consensus with regard to the question of when life begins. We need to stop calling each other bad names, respect each other, and reach a workable solution. If we believe in individual responsibility, we should remove this burden from our court system and put it back into the hands of the people where it belongs."

    I would assert that it is my belief that human life begins at implantation..... only at this point, when the embryo joins the mother, does growth truly begin, in my opinion.

    But do we make provisions for rape or the life/ health of the mother? If we're gonna be absolute and say that life begins, say, at conception, do we make a girl who is raped by her father carry that child to birth? What if she is raped by her H.S. gym teacher and is so scared she doesn't tell anyone till she starts showing? If that child is a child and is guaranteed constitutional protection than each should be required to deliver the child? Same with any situation where the health or life of the mother is involved. If a 16 year old girl shows up in the ER at 4 AM and is 9 months pregnant and contracting, having had no prenatal care and has a breech baby who's head has a condition called hydrocephalus in which the skull is filled with water. A cesarean section would greatly decrease her ability to have children later in life because of the size of incision needed to deliver the greatly enlarged head. A partial birth abortion of this child (who is not viable due to the fact it has no higher brain) would make it easy to deliver the child without causing undue physical harm to the mother and also increase her chances of fertility later in life ( like when she's 25, married and out of college).

    And lastly..... if my wife gets pregnant in 2006 but we don't deliver until 2007 can I still get the tax write off for '06?

    But you are right FF..... we as a nation have to address this. it is our "slavery" if you get my meaning. I was interested that when Justice Roberts called Roe v Wade "settled law" that no one brought up Plessy v Ferguson. That was settled law for like 56 years or something wasn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  53. Jabba the Hutta8:20 PM

    HUh Huh Huh

    little worefus frog cometh here and I will devour you...

    Your crossed ways will not longer be dark trouble to the FORCE

    huh huh huh

    golbbe gobble gobble slurppppp...

    ReplyDelete
  54. As to the discussion of electronic voting and election stealing....

    Has election stealing never
    occurred in a presidential election with paper ballots?........ More then one of my (R) friends, when confronted with the observation that possibly Bush stole Fla in 2000 has responded simply by referring to 1960 in Illinois by saying..... "we're even".

    I ain't saying it's right. I'm just saying it is. Elections have been stolen with paper ballots (TWICE!) and maybe they'll be stolen electronically as well.

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  55. Freedom Fan; some questions, I have. These are the first and I'll post more later. I have read your post, and these questions occurred to me.

    Unlike Libertarians, Conservatives also believe that providing a social safety net is an important function of government.

    What is your view on the minimum wage, and required overtime laws?
    Social security Insurance?(the true name of the program)

    Government should guarantee a minimum level of subsistence for all its citizens.

    Does this include medical care?
    How do you view medicade and medicare?

    However, the state of being poor or disadvantaged should be viewed as a result of temporary circumstances. Each person, regardless of current social status or background or temporary setbacks, has the potential to become a productive, happy, fulfilled member of society, and is capable of achieving success.

    No disagreement at all.

    It is government’s function to ensure equality of opportunity not attempt to achieve equality of results.

    Accepted but, does the equality of opportunity include aid in education to bring people who have potential out of economic circumstances that are not of their own making? I had no say what so ever in the economic status of my parents.

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  56. ...they would have to know that such tactics out here in the boonies will land them face down on a gurney while a nurse pulls rocksalt out of their ass.
    -Worfeus

    Heh..heh..heh (channelling Eddie Murphy) I like that. Too bad Cheney didn't just pack rock salt...

    Hey looks like you have an "admirer". Congratulations.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Who Jabba the Hutt?

    He just wants the money for the load I dumped coming out of hyperspace.

    Thought that imperial cruiser was gonna board me.

    ReplyDelete
  58. What is your view on the minimum wage, and required overtime laws? Social security Insurance?(the true name of the program)
    -Clif

    I start with the premise that freedom is of paramount importance in a society. Since freedom allows each individual to realize his full human potential, there must be a very, very compelling reason before government is allowed to interfere with freedom of any sort. I am disturbed that the historical trend is to accept more and more intrusion into our lives, reduce our choices, and ultimately destroy liberty.

    Private industry almost always does a better job of providing goods and services because it has competition and offers its customers choices. Government solutions should only be provided for certain narrow functions like national defense.

    Minimum wage laws increase joblessness by forcing employers to pay new entrants, into the job market, a rate of pay which is artificially high relative to their market worth. It also increases general price levels introducing inflationary pressure into the economy.

    This is easy to demonstrate by asking: What should the “maximum” minimum wage be? $10/hr? $20? $200? Why hesitate to force employers to offer every worker $100,000 salaries? You can immediately imagine the market distortions which would result; the economic damage created by the minimum wage is directly correlated to the level you choose. Basically we tolerate a certain amount of damage in order to allow politicians to buy votes; the resulting unemployed folks are then subsidized by food stamps and welfare.

    Here's another way of testing whether setting a minimum wage makes sense economically: What percentage of workers make minimum wage? It's pretty small, so why would an employer pay someone more than the government forces him to pay? The reason is not altruism; the reason is competition. Different skills are worth more to the employer, based upon supply and demand.

    The lesson? If someone wants to make more money, then he needs to acquire the skills that are most in demand by employers, or do the work that others don’t want to do, or start a business which capitalizes on his unique capabilities and knowledge. Once again a person is happiest when he accepts personal responsibility and rejects government "help". Does anyone really want to accept minimum anything?

    As for Social Security, to be fair it should be uniform for all workers, both government and non-government. Also it should be voluntary if possible. At a minimum, individuals should be given control over their contributions to manage like we can currently manage our own Individual Retirement Accounts. This free ride that government gets needs to stop; they use our money for our entire lifetimes and then give us back less (in current dollar terms) than we have contributed. It’s a raw deal; few folks ever even stop to think about it in those terms.

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  59. And lastly..... if my wife gets pregnant in 2006 but we don't deliver until 2007 can I still get the tax write off for '06?
    -Kirk12

    Funny. You already know the answer...you profile reader you.

    Yeah abortion is a tough subject. I honestly think Roe v Wade was a pretty good compromise between the mother's rights and the baby's. I doubt that any court will ever dare to overturn it. However, subsequent interpretations expanded the mother's rights to allow termination of a viable baby in the third trimester for just about any reason; this is unacceptable.

    My concern is that the decision appears to allow activist judges to do whatever they please with impugnity, ignoring the Constitution, and the will expressed by the voters through the legislative process. This is a dangerous precedent and makes me nervous about the future of our free nation. My only consolation is that this is an exception; a situation in which legislators were too timid to act, and the court filled the void.

    ReplyDelete
  60. Was the free enterprise that existed pre-great depression, the style of private industry that you propose?

    Minimum wage laws increase joblessness by forcing employers to pay new entrants, into the job market, a rate of pay which is artificially high relative to their market worth.

    $5.15/hr is high? Try living on it.

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  61. FF Said;

    isn't it fair for you to supply the name of the high-ranking Democrat who was responsible for monitoring this project? Wouldn't this represent an example of massive incompetence on his part? .

    Well it all depends on his role.

    I can tell you that going through thousands and even millions of lines of code is not an easy thing to do. And if its a ROM Chip, detecting it would be extremely difficult.

    The software alone could take years to examine. Remember the 2000 Bug? I worked on that one, for years. I was not a coder, I played a different role, but my task force was assigned strictly to that purpose for over 2 years.

    And this was just for one organization, albeit extremely large.

    If this was done, and it probably was in some states, then it would have had to be an extremely clandestine operation.

    There is not going to be a paper trail, and not much of a people trail.

    You can't expect a high level official with a 40,000 foot view of a project to know if a ROM Chip wasn't hardcoded by some low level assembly language or machine language programmer who did this under some very covert circumstances.

    Of course it is important to also point out that I am not accusing anyone, particularly Bush. This is way out of his league technically, and personally I can't see a need to know for him on this one.

    People in his administration may have acted under the orders of a Bush subordinate, or possibly even on their own.

    This is not the kind of thing where you can just say, prove it.

    I'm asking questions, and examining some peripheral data, like the sudden propensity of exit polls in highly democratic districts to suddenly be askew by a huge factor and on a consistent basis with regards to the actual ballot count.

    We don't always have to have a smoking gun if there is enough evidence to support the notion, we can use the peripheral evidence

    Its the same way we know the Universe is expanding. Of course we can't actually see the Universe expanding, but we know that it is because of lateral evidence like the effects of Red Shift and the impact on Hubbles Law. As the light is traveling away we can see the shift in the electromagnetic field and we know that the object is moving away and we can also see thanks to Edwin Hubble that the shift is proportional to the distance of the objects from us. It shows us the universe is not only expanding, but the further out you go, the faster it is expanding (which is a mind blower in and of itself), hence now we can speculate as to it origins, because we see the evidence of an explosion. A relatively recent one by cosmic dating, one we call The Big Bang.

    Likewise we can find distance planets that are too small to reflect sunlight back to our telescopes, by the wobble of a star it orbits. The gravitational pull causes the star to wobble and hence we can even estimate the size of the planet by the nature of the wobble.

    A much simpler analogy is knowing there is wind, because you see the effects on the trees and the leaves.

    I have looked at the evidence, and considered the likelihood, the propensity of the individuals involved, the ease of implementation, execution and forensic cleanup, and looked at most of the theories making the rounds on the web, and have long since concluded there are good reasons to at least have a full multi-partisan (how bout somebody that hates both repubs and dems look at it too?) investigation into the matter. And in the interim I would invoke a moratorium on electronic ballots until the investigation is completed.

    And once it is, I would require a hard copy be printed with every vote and inserted into a secure sealed ballot box in case a manual recount is required.

    Its our country, and a cavalier attitude towards the integrity of our electoral process indicates that person is either corrupt or apathetic about his countries political development.

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  62. The lesson? If someone wants to make more money, then he needs to acquire the skills that are most in demand by employers, or do the work that others don’t want to do, or start a business which capitalizes on his unique capabilities and knowledge.

    Unless those jobs are being outsourced overseas to below minimum wage. Also the minimum wage sets a standard that one should be able to live off of, and the high school argument is gone with the large amount of illegal immigrants working where the high school's used to. Try most Mickey-D's here and it is not high school, also roofers, construction laborers. The minimum wage is being undermined by the surge of illegal immigrants working with out papers. I live not to far from Churchill Downs where they run the Kentucky Derby and the back side has almost entirely been outsourced in place with illegals. Same as the cleaning company that got caught working in Wal-marts. We will disagree because, I believe, from a societal standpoint underpaying causes way many more problems than the increased profits justify. Just as outsourcing jobs removes income from middle and lower wage Americans to the detriment of the economy, hiring Illegal workers also has the same effect, by removing the source for the jobs.

    ReplyDelete
  63. I don't want to get side tracked but I can't help a quick note on minimum wage.

    FF SaidWhat percentage of workers make minimum wage? It's pretty small, so why would an employer pay someone more than the government forces him to pay?

    I think you are wrong about the percentage. Most food services, janitorial, and labor jobs tend to be minimum wage or below, particularly in rural areas, so I don't think it's that low.

    Either way asking any American to give up one 3rd of their life to labor, and then not even pay them enough to put any sort of roof over their heads other than a cardboard one, is a sin.

    ReplyDelete
  64. Another fact to look at Worfeus, is exit polls, where the UN uses a statistic of, over 5% varience between the vote and the pool as evidence of fraud, in some Ohio counties in 2004 the varience was 11%.

    ReplyDelete
  65. Minimum wage 'Fun Facts'

    Since 1997, Congress has given itself a pay raise, 7 TIMES.

    Since 1997, Congress has given the working class people of America a raise in minimum wage, ZERO TIMES.

    ReplyDelete
  66. Working 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year at minimum wage will leave a family with only ONE child $5000.00 per year BELOW the poverty level.

    ReplyDelete
  67. Freedom Fan: That’s why Conservatives honor patriots with the nobility and compassion to lay down their very lives when necessary to defend the right of their friends to enjoy freedom and safety.

    How? By actually cutting the budget the VA uses, not in total but in dollar amount per veteran, in other words they are spending less for each veteran they care for this year than last.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Clif said

    Another fact to look at Worfeus, is exit polls, where the UN uses a statistic of, over 5% varience between the vote and the pool as evidence of fraud,

    Wow, thats a great point. Over 5 percent? These things were like over 30 percent and greater in many places in 04. Same in 00 in Florida.

    Wow, maybe we should look at similar laws. That might provide incentive to get it right.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Worfeus this was brought to my attention in relationship to the ports sale, it is funny

    http://www.workingforchange.com/comic.cfm?itemid=19635

    ReplyDelete
  70. I can hear one response Those UN liberals blah blah blah ............... don't believe anything those communists ever say. (LOL)

    ReplyDelete
  71. Thats pretty good Clif.

    On the UAE sale, I think we may have some light on the horizon.

    Two Republican Govenors, Pataki and Erlich and one Democratic Mayor (Marty O'Malley) or working to block the allocation in their states, New York and Maryland.

    I am sure other states are going to follow suit. NO ONE seems to be on board with this one.

    Bush just thought he could sneak it past us, but then all the Bloggers (us too on a small scale) went nuts, reporters picked it up and now everyone is saying, "huh, Bush is doing what?".

    ReplyDelete
  72. You can pull a lot on a lot of people, but when you've made your shtick on protecting America from Muslim Arab terrorists, and then try to sell control over our most sensitive homeland defense locations to the same Muslim Arab nation that financed the Sept 11 attacks, you're gonna loose most people.

    Guaranteed.

    ReplyDelete
  73. Ehrlich, concerned about security at the Port of Baltimore, said Monday he is "very troubled" that Maryland officials got no advance notice before the Bush administration approved an Arab company's takeover of the operations at the six ports.

    "We needed to know before this was a done deal, given the state of where we are concerning security," Ehrlich told reporters in the State House rotunda in Annapolis.

    AP

    ReplyDelete
  74. Worfeus good reading but sit down you'll not believe they still say things like this with a straight face



    http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/0828-08.htm

    ReplyDelete
  75. How insane does a man have to be to decide that a few years after 911, to hand over major port operations to the United Arab Emirates?

    How crazy?

    And how dumb does an American sheeple have to be to buy that he is competent and cares about our national security?

    Of all the hairbrained lamebrained birdbrained notions I have ever heard, this one past absurd out of the starting gate, and never looked back.

    If this is not evidence to impeach him just for incompetence I don't know what is.

    Perhaps when he sells the TSA Airport Security contracts to the UAE?

    BTW, polls show right now that 86 percent of Americans think this is a lamebrain idea, thank God.

    ReplyDelete
  76. What rigged elections lead to;

    What It Means To Be A Republican

    A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
    by Larry Beinhart

    The vice president shoots you in the heart and in the face. Then you apologize for all the trouble it’s caused him. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    Despite almost hysterical warnings the president stays asleep at the wheel. He does nothing about terrorism and 9/11 happens. He responds by running away to Nebraska. Three days later he makes a supposedly impromptu speech with a bull horn on the rubble of the World Trade Center. He is universally cheered as a hero. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The president puts together false claims to go to war with the wrong country. His party universally supports him. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The administration mismanages the war in Iraq so that it creates chaos, a breeding ground for terrorists and political opportunities for Islamic fundamentalists. Along the way, the reasons for going to war are exposed as false. The president runs on national security as his main issue. He is re-elected. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The president cheerfully gives away the surplus to the richest people in the country. Then he runs up record debts, just to throw more money their way. He claims it has helped America’s economy. People act like they believe him. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The administration continues it’s magnificent tradition of going to sleep when it is warned of disaster. It does nothing when Katrina is coming. It continues its record of doing nothing when disaster arrives. As New Orleans was lost, just as when the World Trade Center was lost, the president got as far away as possible. But he can’t be blamed for what nature did. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The president orders wiretaps without warrants, a straightforward violation of the constitution. When the Attorney General is called to testify, the head of the Judiciary Committee insists that his testimony not be under oath. The head of the intelligence committee suggests that the law be changed, now, to make it legal after the fact. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    Alberto Gonzales helped come up with the program that rejected the Geneva Conventions, that permits torture, that says that the president is above the law and that “I was only following orders” should be a defense against a charge of war crimes. Ah, if only the Nazi war criminals who were hung at Nuremberg had Gonzales there to defend them. The president nominates Gonzales to be his new Attorney General. He is confirmed with little debate and no outrage. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    This needs to be understood.

    What it implies is that Republicans can’t be dealt with as if reason and facts will sway them. Because it won't. It’s hard for reality-based people, regular Democrats and Liberals, to understand that.

    What it lets us know is that reality-based people -- Democrats, Liberals, real Conservatives, old-fashioned Republicans and non-profit Christians -- have to take more vigorous and rigorous stands. Or reality and real American values and the American landscape will disappear, not just temporarily, but forever.

    ReplyDelete
  77. In December 2005, Diebold's CEO Wally O'Dell left the company following reports that the company was facing securities fraud litigation surrounding charges of insider trading. And we were supposed to trust him?

    ReplyDelete
  78. Its hard to read posts like that and not become angry or disgusted.

    That was a great summary on what it is to be republican.

    I guess we should look for an upcoming what it means to be a democrat to follow, LOL.

    ReplyDelete
  79. A good story about Diebold and Election Systems and Software another electronic voting machine company broiled in questionable elections

    http://www.motherjones.com/commentary/columns/2004/03/03_200.html

    Lydia you should add some info about ES&S since diebold si not the only ones doing this.

    ReplyDelete
  80. Worfeus I thought I'd never tell anyone to go to this web site and rejoice but stranger things are happening

    http://www.sistertoldjah.com/

    The fools are even bringing the left and right together, who'd a thunk?

    ReplyDelete
  81. You're a machine Clif.

    ReplyDelete
  82. Who knows, maybe theres hope for us yet, ay?

    ReplyDelete
  83. Lynn Landes is a gutsy American woman following the example of the sufragettes, who fought battles for basic voting civil rights that seemed unwinnable. That is, until they won.

    Landes is fighting the suit in the United States Supreme Court as a citizen, by herself, with no lawyer (called a Pro Se case). In her courage, she is resuscitating the spirit of historic independent actions by the citizenry.


    http://www.bbvforums.org/cgi-bin/forums/board-auth.cgi?file=/1954/17790.html

    They said it better,

    maybe there is hope.

    ReplyDelete
  84. You couldn't make this up, a convicted felon who's involved in the software of Diebold, ES&S as well as others, seems Abrarmoff wasn't the only felon with republican ties. This came out of a blackboxvoting.org website story but this part needed to be posted,

    worfeus let me know is he really able to do things that we wouldn't want done please.

    Who's Jeffrey Dean?

    Jeffrey Dean was convicted of 23 felony counts involving sophisticated computer fraud. He spent four years in prison (1991-1995). While he was in prison, his wife obtained absentee ballot processing contracts with King County, Wash. A group of investors from Omaha purchased his brother's business shortly before Jeff Dean got out of prison and he began working at his brother's mail processing plant from prison while on work release.

    Upon release from prison, Jeff Dean developed the programs that handle mail sorting and counting for PSI Group, as well as the ballot mail processing programs.

    Regarding computer programming, Dean testified: "I'm proficient in some archaic languages and proficient in visual basic. I have a dangerous working knowledge of postscript."

    For those who are enthused about mail-in voting: Jeffrey Dean created both the ballot sorting and mailing software and the authentication software used by ballot processor PSI Group and Diebold Election Systems. He also reportedly installed the mail-handling software in Las Vegas, Nev. (Sequoia Voting Systems), Maricopa County, Ariz. (ES&S), and at one point it was running in Snohomish County, Wash. as well. Jeffrey Dean's mail-in voting software has never been certified or examined at all, and it is not required to be certified.

    ReplyDelete
  85. This website is a must to understand the depth of the electronic voting scandal problem,

    http://www.blackboxvoting.org/

    Many stories from many states.

    ReplyDelete
  86. More on Mr. Dean;(not John Dean Nixons lawyer, but there are connections to watergate figures just the same)

    http://www.bbvforums.org/cgi-bin/forums/board-auth.cgi?file=/1954/17305.html

    worth reading

    ReplyDelete
  87. The republicans in Alaska fighting the democrats from investigating the 2004 vote;

    http://www.bbvforums.org/cgi-bin/forums/board-auth.cgi?file=/1954/17302.html

    Florida, Ohio, California, Washington, Alaska, the list keeps getting longer, will we make all 50 before 2008?

    ReplyDelete
  88. "When the State of Maryland hired a computer security firm to test its new machines, these paid hackers had little trouble casting multiple votes and taking over the machines' vote-recording mechanisms. The Maryland study shows convincingly that more security is needed for electronic voting, starting with voter-verified paper trails."

    When Maryland decided to buy 16,000 AccuVote-TS voting machines, there was considerable opposition. Critics charged that the new touch-screen machines, which do not create a paper record of votes cast, were vulnerable to vote theft. The state commissioned a staged attack on the machines, in which computer-security experts would try to foil the safeguards and interfere with an election.

    They were disturbingly successful. It was an "easy matter," they reported, to reprogram the access cards used by voters and vote multiple times. They were able to attach a keyboard to a voting terminal and change its vote count. And by exploiting a software flaw and using a modem, they were able to change votes from a remote location.

    Critics of new voting technology are often accused of being alarmist, but this state-sponsored study contains vulnerabilities that seem almost too bad to be true. Maryland's 16,000 machines all have identical locks on two sensitive mechanisms, which can be opened by any one of 32,000 keys. The security team had no trouble making duplicates of the keys at local hardware stores, although that proved unnecessary since one team member picked the lock in "approximately 10 seconds."

    Diebold, the machines' manufacturer, rushed to issue a self-congratulatory press release with the headline "Maryland Security Study Validates Diebold Election Systems Equipment for March Primary." The study's authors were shocked to see their findings spun so positively. Their report said that if flaws they identified were fixed, the machines could be used in Maryland's March 2 primary. But in the long run, they said, an extensive overhaul of the machines and at least a limited paper trail are necessary.

    The Maryland study confirms concerns about electronic voting that are rapidly accumulating from actual elections. In Boone County, Ind., last fall, in a particularly colorful example of unreliability, an electronic system initially recorded more than 144,000 votes in an election with fewer than 19,000 registered voters, County Clerk Lisa Garofolo said. Given the growing body of evidence, it is clear that electronic voting machines cannot be trusted until more safeguards are in place.

    Thus these machines can be hacked FF

    eNuff said

    ReplyDelete
  89. The average security clearance, Top Secret, SF86, takes an average of 6 months for an individual.

    Dubai ports was cleared without any interviews or indepth background investigation in just 23 days.

    23 Days.

    ReplyDelete
  90. The sale was performed in a clandestine fashion by the Bush administration, not telling any members of Congress or even the State Officials of the impacted states.

    In fact, we didn't know about it at all until last week when Bush gave the stamp of approval on the sale.

    Was this another matter of national security to keep this sale of major operations of our ports a secret to the very officials responsible for the ports?

    Why was this done covertly?

    I can think of no good reason, but plenty of bad ones.

    ReplyDelete
  91. Freedom fan the free market seem to be slipping along with working class wages.

    Fastest-growing Jobs Losing Real Value
    by Brendan Coyne

    Feb. 20 – Recent statistics show that the fastest-growing jobs in the US also happen to be those with the lowest compensation. At the same time, the minimum wage is, in real dollar terms, the lowest it has been since its enactment in 1947.

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) last month reported that the official unemployment rate had fallen to 4.7 percent.

    Buried in the rosy economic scenario portrayed by recentBLS reports is the fact that few jobs in the fastest-growing categories pay well. According to the BLS January jobs report, food-service and service-provider jobs grew a combined 69,000 in January.

    The report was followed this month by the BLS annual Occupational Outlook Handbook, which projects continued rapid growth in demand for home-healthcare workers, medical assistants and personal-care aides, all service-related jobs that generally pay little more than the minimum wage.

    Though service-related employment categories do include managerial and non-supervisory positions that are better compensated, the majority of such jobs pay little more -- and in some cases, such as restaurant workers, less -- than the minimum wage, which is now less than a third of the average hourly wage, according to an analysis released by the Economic Policy Institute Friday.

    Of the 30 fastest-growing occupations, six do not require higher education and another eight demand just an associate’s degree.

    According to the EPI, which advocates for a higher wage floor, the minimum wage has been consistently below 40 percent of the average hourly wage for 23 years and has been falling steadily since 1998, the last time it came near the 40 percent mark. Last month, the average hourly wage was $16.41, more than three times the federal minimum.

    ReplyDelete
  92. And for some humor,

    http://homepage.mac.com/rcareaga/diebold/adworks.htm


    Some of these are funny, but it takes a bit to load

    ReplyDelete
  93. This doesn't leave me with a warm or fuzzy feeling

    http://www.consortiumnews.com/2006/022106a.html

    another warm and fuzzy story

    http://buzzflash.com/farrell/06/02/far06003.html

    ditto

    http://www.ocnus.net/artman/publish/article_22660.shtml

    Say it ain't so, didn't somebody all ready try this?

    http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/r210_35.pdf

    together these links could produce a scary senero for a new action movie but they are happening for real here in the good ole USA.

    ReplyDelete
  94. jabba the Hutt5:18 AM

    I"ve just finished doopping the remains of the little frog on in an open white receptacle when an idea struck....

    lets just nationalize those docks in the name of national security when we need to, that way we will keep the docks and the money --------------------next time a crissis occurs ..

    ReplyDelete
  95. What it implies is that Republicans can’t be dealt with as if reason and facts will sway them. Because it won't. It’s hard for reality-based people, regular Democrats and Liberals, to understand that.
    -Clif

    Clif, I am shocked, shocked to find you using sweeping generalizations!

    Here's another essay for you Clif: Conservatism v. Liberalism: A Riddle and Hope for the New Year

    (Warning: Do Not Read If You Are Terrified By Sweeping Generalizations)

    How do two intelligent people study the same facts and arrive at opposite conclusions?
    I submit that each person begins with a set of core values which comprise a particular world view. Therefore my conclusion may differ from yours because we each start with, and build upon, a different premise. Politically, Conservatives and Liberals have polar opposite world views and each must subjectively distort facts to fit into that world view. Both world views cannot be correct, although some combination may be possible. How are Conservative and Liberal world views different?

    -Freedom Fan

    ReplyDelete
  96. Anonymous8:25 AM

    Clif, your 11:57PM post just pretty much summed up my last 6 weeks of posting.


    Clif said "What rigged elections lead to;

    What It Means To Be A Republican

    A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
    by Larry Beinhart

    The vice president shoots you in the heart and in the face. Then you apologize for all the trouble it’s caused him. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    Despite almost hysterical warnings the president stays asleep at the wheel. He does nothing about terrorism and 9/11 happens. He responds by running away to Nebraska. Three days later he makes a supposedly impromptu speech with a bull horn on the rubble of the World Trade Center. He is universally cheered as a hero. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The president puts together false claims to go to war with the wrong country. His party universally supports him. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The administration mismanages the war in Iraq so that it creates chaos, a breeding ground for terrorists and political opportunities for Islamic fundamentalists. Along the way, the reasons for going to war are exposed as false. The president runs on national security as his main issue. He is re-elected. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The president cheerfully gives away the surplus to the richest people in the country. Then he runs up record debts, just to throw more money their way. He claims it has helped America’s economy. People act like they believe him. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The administration continues it’s magnificent tradition of going to sleep when it is warned of disaster. It does nothing when Katrina is coming. It continues its record of doing nothing when disaster arrives. As New Orleans was lost, just as when the World Trade Center was lost, the president got as far away as possible. But he can’t be blamed for what nature did. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    The president orders wiretaps without warrants, a straightforward violation of the constitution. When the Attorney General is called to testify, the head of the Judiciary Committee insists that his testimony not be under oath. The head of the intelligence committee suggests that the law be changed, now, to make it legal after the fact. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    Alberto Gonzales helped come up with the program that rejected the Geneva Conventions, that permits torture, that says that the president is above the law and that “I was only following orders” should be a defense against a charge of war crimes. Ah, if only the Nazi war criminals who were hung at Nuremberg had Gonzales there to defend them. The president nominates Gonzales to be his new Attorney General. He is confirmed with little debate and no outrage. That’s what it means to be a Republican.

    This needs to be understood.

    What it implies is that Republicans can’t be dealt with as if reason and facts will sway them. Because it won't. It’s hard for reality-based people, regular Democrats and Liberals, to understand that.

    What it lets us know is that reality-based people -- Democrats, Liberals, real Conservatives, old-fashioned Republicans and non-profit Christians -- have to take more vigorous and rigorous stands. Or reality and real American values and the American landscape will disappear, not just temporarily, but forever.

    11:57 PM


    Mike

    ReplyDelete
  97. Worfeus said "You can pull a lot on a lot of people, but when you've made your shtick on protecting America from Muslim Arab terrorists, and then try to sell control over our most sensitive homeland defense locations to the same Muslim Arab nation that financed the Sept 11 attacks, you're gonna loose most people.

    Guaranteed. "


    It looks like your right people are finally standing up and seeing how ridiculous what these guys are trying to do really is. I dont know how any one could support the port fiasco or using voting machines that could be compromised, even if they are on the level unless they have some kind of vested interest or there truly was corruption and/or foul play involved, wouldnt you want to insure integrity and want people to have trust and confidence in the process. But I guess thats what happens when you feel your omnipotent you can do what ever you want and dont have to account to anyone. I'm just glad the governors arent playing dead and are fighting this lunacy.

    ReplyDelete
  98. FF -- I read with great interest your bio here, but have to give it more attention later. Sorry I'm out of commission today, but will respond tomorrow night. Thank you.

    Hey EVERYONE -- I have a tidbit of news that I am posting at top of blog on the UAE port deal.

    ReplyDelete
  99. Freedom Fan, I too read your bio with great interest, after reading it I see you in different light and have to say I have gained some respect for you. Like Worfeus, I assumed you were around 28-35 years old, and thought you were a blindly loyal schill to the republican party that was here with bad intentions. I am always somewhat disturbed by people who label others and make broad sterotypical generalizations about others without really knowing them, and are blindly loyal to all their partys political principles and try to preach or convert others. that being said i'll try to take you at your word that you truly believe in ALL these principles you advocate and that your broad generalizations are merely to elicit debate. I do have to say I find it questionable to believe in all the principles advocated by either liberals or conservatives. Like Worfeus I have never registered as a Democrat and although my views are primarily liberal, not all fall along the liberal part of the spectrum, in fact I think you might be surprised by some of them.

    I will post some of my views on some of the issues discussed in the last day or two tonight, when I have more time, as well as my opinion of your article, I look forward to your opinions on them.

    ReplyDelete
  100. jabba the Hutt10:11 AM

    Huh Huh Huh ,

    EXxxxxxxcccccCELLENT !!!

    I await with great AAAAnnnticipation for these and more pearls of wisdom ..
    you are all my kind of svum;)

    Huh Huh Huh ,

    ReplyDelete
  101. A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
    by Larry Beinhart

    What it implies is that Republicans can’t be dealt with as if reason and facts will sway them. Because it won't. It’s hard for reality-based people, regular Democrats and Liberals, to understand that.Larry Bienhart
    -Clif

    Clif, I am shocked, shocked to find you using sweeping generalizations!

    BY Larry Bienhart, his comment I post a whole article do not cherry pick.

    ReplyDelete
  102. You know, even if there wasn't any danger to allowing the UAE to run major operations at our nations shipping ports (it is), it is a slap in the face to every American to hand 6 Billion dollars to an Arab nation that laundered money for the terrorists.

    You would think American would be revolted at the very idea.

    Remember the old line, avoid the very appearence of evil?

    ReplyDelete
  103. regarding the UAE port deal,

    All you have to know is that Jimmah Cahter is FOR it.

    That tells me its wrong right there.

    ReplyDelete
  104. Hey Worf,

    Congratulations, apparently you have acquired a stalker. They're kinda like dust mites in that they are capable of absolutely no cognitive activity and are almost impossible to rid oneself of. No doubt ol' drooling fatso and anonypuss are one in the same. On the bright side, at least you didn't pick up "crabs".

    ReplyDelete
  105. AP Updated: 1:09 p.m. ET Feb. 21, 2006
    WASHINGTON - Senate Republican Leader Bill Frist called Tuesday for the Bush administration to stop a deal permitting a United Arab Emirates company to take over six major U.S. seaports, upping the ante on a fight that several congressmen, governors and mayors are waging with the White House.

    “The decision to finalize this deal should be put on hold until the administration conducts a more extensive review of this matter,” said Frist. “If the administration cannot delay this process, I plan on introducing legislation to ensure that the deal is placed on hold until this decision gets a more thorough review.”

    ReplyDelete
  106. Worfeus said "Remember the old line, avoid the very appearence of evil? "

    Exactly!!

    ReplyDelete
  107. This a real Army regulation, AR 210-35, titled Civilian Imate Labor Program,.... wasn't this tried before?

    http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/r210_35.pdf

    It is dated 14 Janurary 2005, can you think of a reason the Army might need civilian criminal imates to work for them?

    BTW violant criminals, drug criminals, organised crime inmates, sex offenders. escape risks, famous prisoners, need not apply( it's in the regulation)

    This might go along with the detention camps that Halliburton has been contracted to build.

    ReplyDelete
  108. Mike as an aside what do you ride, I have a 2003 dresser I ride and a 2001 1200 sporster I'm building into a small chopper, I also have a 1976 Triumph Tiger I bought to have, I rode a 1979 Triumph Bonnieville 750 Special for years, wish I'd never sold it.

    ReplyDelete
  109. Clif, I just bought a ZX12 Ninja this fall, just finished breaking it in (awesome bike, I love it), I also have several dirt bikes, Ktm 440, Can Am 200 and KX 125, and I really like the Honda VTX 1800 cruiser and the new Triumph with that monster 2300cc motor, maybe i'll get one of those in the next 3-5 years after I get a new car.

    ReplyDelete
  110. I rode a 1979 Triumph Bonnieville 750 Special for years

    I used to ride the old triupmh 3 banger too Clif. I also rode a tiger. Petcock always leaked on the Trident though.

    ReplyDelete
  111. I also had several rice burners too Mike, including a 1975 Suzuki 750 (the Water Buffalo) which was water cooled.

    3 Cylinder, 2 stroke. Had a chopper for a while too, like everyone else, made out of a honda 750 lol.

    ReplyDelete
  112. I always wished I had been a little older to experience those 2 stroke triples, i love 2 strokes, my ZX 12 is an animal, 90 in 1st gear with 6 gears and it can pull the wheel up in at over 100 mph, but its not a 2 stroke.

    ReplyDelete
  113. I loved the limeys but had to work on them alot. My harley just goes and goes, except for last may when bambi and I had a disagreement over a small piece of I-65, bike was almost totaled but I had full coverage, I walked away with a few scratches, my mother says my guardian angel works overtime I'm starting to believe her.

    ReplyDelete
  114. LOL, yea, I've laid down a few times too Clif, back in the day.

    I laid down a Suzuki 380 GT at about 60 MPH when I was 20. I couldn't sit down for 3 months, lol.

    ReplyDelete
  115. Breaking news;

    I picked this up over at Thinkprogress.org.

    Apparently there is even more absurd details of the Dubai Ports Worldwide sale of operations of 6 major US ports.

    Apparently the deal also includes taking control managing the movement of military equipment for the US Army.

    It appears both Donald Rumsfeld and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Peter Pace only learned of the sale this weekend!

    The sale includes giving the UAE owned firm control over military contracts for shipping weapons and military equipment out of 2 ports in Texas.

    ReplyDelete
  116. This deal just keeps getting better and better.

    ReplyDelete
  117. Few Americans are aware of the volume of cargo that is shipped from ports located along the U.S. Gulf Coast from Brownsville, Texas, to Cape Sable, Florida.

    Some of these ports serve as major Department of Defense transportation nodes for overseas deployment of Army cargo. Two of these nodes are strategic ports located in Texas--the Port of Beaumont and the Port of Corpus Christi. (Designation as a strategic port means that the port management will give priority to military cargo during a contingency.)

    Almost 40 percent of the Army cargo deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom flows through these two ports.



    DONALD J. JAPALUCCI,
    842D TRANSPORTATION BATTALION PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

    ReplyDelete
  118. Worfeus said "The sale includes giving a UAE owned firm control over military contracts for shipping weapons and military equipment out of 2 ports in Texas."

    Great now the UAE firm is supervising weapon shipments, it does get better and better, what could these guys be thinking??

    Dumb and Dumber is all I can say.

    ReplyDelete
  119. At least most of the governors are calling a spade a spade and saying what a dumb idea this is and resisting, even Bill Frist is against this idea.

    ReplyDelete
  120. Thats right. Pretty much everybody with a semblance of a soul left is against this idea.

    The Speaker of the House, Dennis Hastert just sent a letter to Bush about an hour ago saying that this deal should not go through, and if it does, he will introduce legislation to block it.

    President Bush responded to Congress today by declaring he will VETO ANY LEGISLATION to BLOCK HIS SALE OF OUR PORTS TO THE UAE.

    ReplyDelete
  121. I wonder what the UAE did for Bush that would keep him so loyal to this sale, even though everyone in America is against it?

    I wonder what they did for Bush that was so important, that he promised them this sale?

    ReplyDelete
  122. Whatever it is, it appears they could be threating to reveal it if Bush doesn't keep an obvious promise he made to them back when they did whatever it was they did that he's so afraid of us finding out.

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  123. Maybe they are threating to release instead of a nuclear bomb, an information bomb.


    Would both of these be classified as a dirty bomb?

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  124. Bush is threating to veto the bill blocking the port deal, hey congress and the white house finally disagree on something, maybe congress will find the testicular fortitude to begin actual oversite.

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  125. At least some people can have a sence of humor about the port deal....

    http://www.allhatnocattle.net/2-21-06_ebay_cheney_bush_uae.htm

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  126. Thats pretty good Clif.

    I went ahead and put in a bid there for $328 bucks plus my entire collection of 1969 Moonwalk jelly jars\drinking glasses.

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  127. I was going to offer my Jethro Tull collection buy realised that I still like jethro, for songs like "too old to Rock and roll and too young to die."

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  128. When I was young, and they packed me off to school, and taught me how to play the game.

    I didn't mind, if they groomed me for success, of if they said, that I was just a fool.

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  129. so I left there in the morning, with their God tucked underneath my arm,

    a half-assed smile, and the book of rules.

    And I asked this God a question, and by way of firm reply, he said I'm not the kind, you have to wind up on Sunday

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  130. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  131. Worfeus said "President Bush responded to Congress today by declaring he will VETO ANY LEGISLATION to BLOCK HIS SALE OF OUR PORTS TO THE UAE."

    HIS SALE HUH???? Lord Bush may as well have said HIS PORTS as well, because thats exactly the way this megalomaniac thinks, He thinks this is HIS COUNTRY and everything in it is his property and all the people are his loyal subjects, its about time some one knocked this pompous dictator off his supposed throne and brought him back to reality that this is our country and he is a mere civil servant who is supposed to serve our citizens.I am so sick and tired of his haughty arrogant attitude that he's calling all the shots.

    and as far as what the UAE did or agreed to do for him, I think it has something to do with oil, like for instance if the price of oil mysteriously spikes this summer then our savior Lord Bush calls in a favor in the fall to bring the price of oil down right before the election so him and the repugs can look like heros and possibly sway the vote.

    1:52 PM

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  132. Think about it.

    In the last month we have learned about THREE major deals with the UAE.

    1. The aquistion of major operations in 6 nations harbors

    2. The SPACE PORT sale from an Arlington VA based firm which will provide the UAE with our SPACE technology and capbiilities.

    3. The sale to the Port Of Dubai 300 Feet of WhsprWave Maritime Security Devices, the SAME devices that they will be responsible for in our harbors.

    Put the peices together.

    Its as easy as 1 2 3.

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  133. It looks like a you scratch my back i'll scratch your back type of deal, we know at least some of what we are doing for the UAE, so the question appears to be what is the UAE doing for the Bush Administration.

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  134. MIKE SAID

    question appears to be what is the UAE doing for the Bush Administration.

    Exactly what I have been saying.

    THATS the question to ask.

    What did they do for him that they are probably threatening to release if he does not push the sale through.

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  135. Worfeus the goberment is preparing for the next attack.... Halliburton built intermint camps and new army regulation for civilian prisoners to work for the Army for no pay or benifits, (it is in the regulation) you can read the new(14 Janurary 2005) Army regulation called Civilian Inmate Labor Program, about how they are to use civilian "convicted?" criminals to preform work on US Army Installations at;

    http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/r210_35.pdf

    Add this to Georges plan to privatise the federal goverment.

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  136. 9-11-07 is all lined up.

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  137. Actually, if you think about it, Dubai Ports World is NOT a private company.

    It is held by the UAE GOVERNMENT.

    So we are selling our port operations to the UAE government essentially.

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  138. Thank God for Martin Omalley.

    He ain't letting them in.

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  139. And while Bush opens the gates to drag in the Trojan Horse, life, (or death), goes on in Iraq.

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  140. Iraq Violence Takes Heavy Toll
    AP - Tue Feb 21, 3:06 PM ET
    BAGHDAD, Iraq -

    A car bomb exploded Tuesday on a street packed with shoppers in a Shiite area of Baghdad, killing 22 people and wounding 28

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  141. Worfeus said;

    I wonder what they did for Bush that was so important, that he promised them this sale?

    Well it appears that a top ranked political analyst, Gordon Chang thinks like worfeus.

    He said on Loud Dobbs tonight;

    “obviously the Bush administration is paying back some favor to the UAE” .

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  142. Must've been one hell of a favor.

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  143. The voting fraud continues;

    http://thinkprogress.org/2006/02/21/the-department-of-disenfranchisement/#comments

    While President Bush proclaims his support for democracy around the world, his Justice Department is busy stifling it here at home. The Department of Justice recently approved Georgia’s plan to force voters to show a state-issued ID that can be obtained in only 59 of the state’s 159 counties, none of which are in the six counties with the highest percentage of African Americans.

    This is especially troubling because of the apparent racist motivations of the bill’s backers. The chief sponsor of Georgia’s bill told the Justice Department that “if there are fewer black voters because of this bill, it will only be because there is less opportunity for fraud.” Even the Justice Department’s own experts believe this will disenfranchise eligible voters.

    Today, Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell (D) announced that he would veto similar legislation in his state because “it would disenfranchise some of the state’s most vulnerable residents.”

    The Department of Justice used to focus on expanding minority voting rights — now they are approving plans to restrict them. There was a time when conservatives would balk at disenfranchising voters — today it’s standard practice.

    – Sam Davis

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  144. This may begin to explain some things...... cher chez la money



    BY MICHAEL McAULIFF
    DAILY NEWS WASHINGTON BUREAU


    WASHINGTON - The Dubai firm that won Bush administration backing to run six U.S. ports has at least two ties to the White House.

    One is Treasury Secretary John Snow, whose agency heads the federal panel that signed off on the $6.8 billion sale of an English company to government-owned Dubai Ports World - giving it control of Manhattan's cruise ship terminal and Newark's container port.

    Snow was chairman of the CSX rail firm that sold its own international port operations to DP World for $1.15 billion in 2004, the year after Snow left for President Bush's cabinet.

    The other connection is David Sanborn, who runs DP World's European and Latin American operations and was tapped by Bush last month to head the U.S. Maritime Administration.

    The ties raised more concerns about the decision to give port control to a company owned by a nation linked to the 9/11 hijackers.

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  145. Notice there is little response to from the right this evening Clif.

    Theres no defense for this.


    None.

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  146. Imagine Bush threatening his FIRST EVER VETO on this!

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  147. This will be one for the history books.

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  148. Worfeus said: "Notice there is little response to from the right this evening Clif.

    Theres no defense for this"


    But you can bet they're all waiting for the talking points..... I'm sure Karl Rove is working on them right now.

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  149. Yes but this port security story is small to me compared to the camps built by Halliburton and the AR-210-35, I see a larger plan at work and after martial law there will be no turning back, the congress is going to stall the deal and there will be changes made, but who is questioning the new regulation and why they needed it? Having been in the situation where I had to read regulations and decide how best to impliment them I can see alot of bad out of this, even more than the torture letters of gonzolas did in the hands of the same military. Given Rumsfeld track record I have no trust with a reg like this.

    Have you read the regulation Worf? What I see is not good.

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  150. Kirk said;

    But you can bet they're all waiting for the talking points..... I'm sure Karl Rove is working on them right now.

    I already know what it is. In fact, they're using it now.

    Racisism.

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  151. CLIF Said;

    this port security story is small to me compared to the camps built by Halliburton and the AR-210-35,

    Have you read the regulation Worf? What I see is not good.


    No, I'm hearing it for the first time here.

    Kinda like Rummy... :D

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  152. If you can believe the hubris Kirk the same guys who fiddled while the country drowned during Katrina, are going to play the race card.

    They are going to push that its racist to deny the UAE the right to manage our shipping ports simply because they are Arabs.

    Guess what, it won't fly.

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  153. Kirk said "But you can bet they're all waiting for the talking points..... I'm sure Karl Rove is working on them right now. "

    5:16 PM


    No I think Rove allready came up with their talking points just like he did when congress asked for information on the domestic spying program "thats classified, we wont talk about it." see I dont think they will even try to defend the decision, because they cant, they will just keep up with the same pompous "we're calling the shots and dont have to explain to you what we are doing" rhetoric just like they did for their illegal domestic spying propgram.

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  154. Its not just that they are Arab. (although after 911 that works for me).

    Here are some other considerations.

    1. The UAE is a Fundementalist Islamic State (isn't our war now called something like the struggle against islamic extremism?)

    2. Two of the 911 Hijackers were from the UAE

    3. The 911 Commission Report found that the finances for the 911 attacks were financed and laundered through the UAE.

    4. The UAE was one of only 3 countries to recognize the Taliban as a legitimate government.

    5. Dubai Ports Worldwide is not a privatly held firm. It is owned by the Fundementalist UAE government.

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  155. Read it, it will make your skin crawl, an Army regulation to use us civilian inmates(it does not say they have to be convicted of any crime, enemy combatents anyone, how about those who are found deminstrating in unapproved places, or those who get swept up in security sweeps and held for years?) to preform work for the army for no pay, benifits, that is in the regulation,

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  156. They had similar laws.

    In ancient Rome.

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  157. Ancient Rome Yes another Imperial democracy, however the more modern form used in europe in the 30's and 40's as well as the USSR from 1929 until the late 80's is probably more accurate

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  158. how they are to use civilian "convicted?" criminals to preform work

    exactley what extreme left wing dictatorships do----after they shoot everyone with high school or above education in the back of the head ....

    such criminals are made the new police force

    yes officer I had a nice watch you can take....

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  159. I remeber it welll

    as should you

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  160. Anonymous7:45 PM

    http://www.bisbos.com/rocketscience/tta/goblin.html


    spacebob

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  161. With this UAE deal and subsequent veto threat, Bush has inexplicably committed political suicide.

    I have resigned to watch four years of hillary's elephant ankles, faux motherly smiles, transparent lies, enthusiastic support for abortion past the 4th trimester, attempts to nationalize or cripple vast portions of U.S. private enterprise, and disinterested neglect followed by panicked overreaction to the actions of our determined islamofascist foes.

    Although Conservative ideas are vastly superior, our leadership has failed us; congratulations dhimmicrats.

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  162. FF,

    Not to worry too much. Hillary is wayyyy too polarizing. It'd probably be close, but the "anybody but Hillary" vote would probably carry the day.

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  163. our leadership has failed us; congratulations dhimmicrats.


    Wow, now I feel bad.

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  164. Voltaire,

    What the hell is going on, buddy? This is simply insane.

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  165. FF,

    I have no idea. There ARE pros and cons to the deal. That said, I firmly think the cons outweigh any pros.

    If for no other reason than this is a PR nightmare it should NEVER have been done.

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  166. Well since you feel that way FF, maybe nows a good time for liberals and conservatives of some level of sanity come together to make sure Hillary does not get annointed queen, and we continue down another 4 years of a government that makes us look like a monkey fu#$#$ing a football.

    Lets get together on a real candidate, from either party, from any party, from no party, just a good man or woman that shares common values of decency and that we can both feel good about.

    Of course, I have no freakin idea who that would be, but ya gotta start somewhere.

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  167. Worf, we can count on your support for Newt then right?

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  168. Maybe we should just all give old Ralph Nader a shot.

    Those of us old enough to remember all he did for the people of this country to help force manufacturers into complying with safety guidelines, and of course who could forget Consumer Reports?

    Nader might turn things around. The truth is, theres money everywhere now.

    Rich hogs like Bush and his Arab buddies want to hog the trough to themselves, and their kind so people fight and die like chess pieces being moved on a board.

    Problem is, Bush apparently sucks at Chess.

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  169. "all he did for the people of this country..."

    You mean like cause the price of consumer goods to go way up?

    Or perhaps you mean making some folks rich through inane lawsuits and making companies put some of the stupidest safety labels I've ever seen on products?

    You guys were saying we were acting imperialistic abroad, and now you're advocating being imperialistic at home?

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  170. I have to agree anybody but Billary again

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  171. No Nader or McCain,

    as an aside wonder what Karl is doing now that his threats to congress won't stop the repug's or dems from passing the bill or overriding the veto.

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  172. I don't see Hillary getting it.

    We just don't like her.

    And I also think the Dems may give up the Abortion deal. Hillary won't, she'll stump it.

    Besides, Bush got your boys on the Supreme Court, so you have nothing to worry about there.

    The moment Alito was sworn in Abortion was out the door.

    Or didn't anyone notice that on his first official day on the bench abortion just happened to be on the docket?

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  173. Maybe Ann can rally the troops and do a Harriet Miers on this deal?

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  174. Who then Voltaire?

    Freedom Fan?

    Who then?

    Give me a name. A name I can get behind.

    ReplyDelete
  175. I'm trying to think of republicans I like now.

    hmmmm

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  176. I'd love to see Newt run, but I think he'd have about as much of a chance as Hillary.

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  177. McCain would never survive the primaries. He's stabbed the Republican party in the back way too many times.

    ReplyDelete
  178. Condi would be good, but she says shes not going to run....

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  179. Yea, I couldn't do Newt.

    Lindsey Graham has shown some real common sense over the last 6 or 8 months.

    Kinda like he found his soul again or something.

    What about Paul Hackett? He's a marine, Iraq war hero, couldn't you get behind someone like that?

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  180. Naww, Hackett shot his mouth off too many times last election. I don't like his rhetoric...

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  181. How about Zell Miller? He's a little old, but heck so was Reagan...

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  182. Anonymous9:21 PM

    I'm afraid both sides would swift-boat hacket, he won't play by their rules so they'd have to bring him down before most people knew much about him, the politicos don't want any loose cannons that might mess up the game and cause them to be on the outside of the loop, sorry to be so cynical but that's the way I see it.

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  183. Yeah I checked the Coulter Blog--nada. WSJ-silent. Rumsfeld goes well I'll hafta study this; first I've heard of it (unbelievable!) Hannity ripped Dubya, as did Savage, Malkin, and Al Rantel. Limbaugh gave some lame justification about making your enemy your friend...problem is sleeping with a rattlesnake is proly a more valid analogy.

    Somebody 'splain this to me; I admit bafflement.

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  184. Wow, this is gonna be hard.

    Ok, how about Martin O'Malley?

    Mayor of Baltimore? He's a Democrat but he's kind of conservative.

    Martin O'Malley's website

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  185. Joe Scarborough was livid.

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  186. I like Frist, but admit I don't know too much about him.

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  187. Frist?

    Yea,,,,this is gonna be a bitch...

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  188. Okay this is my prediction (remember where you first heard it):

    Bill Richardson, Guv of N.M.

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  189. Richardson? I don't see that happening.

    But I will listen to why he would be good.

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  190. Alright, I am opening the question to the floor.

    We are now accepting suggestions for a Presidential candidate from any party, or no party, that we can all feel good about.

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  191. The Dubai group have interlocking monetary links with carlyl(sp) Exxon-Mobil and other groups that Bush41 and Bush 43 are beholden to. This deal is more about keeping the cosy ties that the Carlyl Group and its players then Homeland Security. Plus Sec. of Treus Snow was CEO fo CSX RR before he went to Tres. His deputy was Named Sanborn who came to CSX from the Conrail RR deal, CSX owned operating rights to ports in Brazil and elseware and sold them to Dubai Ports World, the same company trying to buy the US ports. Mr. Sanborn became a member of the board of directors, and ran the ports that CSX had sold, later this announcement was made; Dave Sanborn, has been nominated by US President George W. Bush to serve as Maritime Administrator a key transportation appointment reporting directly to Norman Mineta the Secretary of Transportation and Cabinet Member. The rest is as they say is todays news.

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  192. Lydia Said;

    Obviously this whole thing is coming down because Bush & Co. has been doing family business with these people for many years.

    Come to think about it, I reckon this is par for the course for the Bush family.

    Bush's Grandpa's, both of em, were well acqauinted with trading with the enemy. In fact the FBI had to shut one of them down, for violating the Trading with the Enemy Act.

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  193. Speaking of Homeland Security, WHY, oh WHY did Bush KEEP Norman Mineta? That should be a scandal in itself...

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  194. They played America like a plastic banjo.

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  195. I've never failed to pick the winner...except for Clinton...hafta admit to being blindsided on that one.

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  196. Well, I'll check in tomorrow.
    I'm roached.

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  197. TED BRIDIS
    Associated Press Writer
    10 minutes ago

    WASHINGTON -
    Brushing aside objections from Republicans and Democrats alike, President Bush endorsed the takeover of shipping operations at six major U.S. seaports by a state-owned business in the United Arab Emirates.

    He pledged to veto any bill Congress might approve to block the agreement

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  198. Apparently he thinks hes a king.

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